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Articles by Jukka Pietilä

Category: Article

article id 5391, category Article
Jukka Pietilä. (1989). Shape of Scots pine knots close to the stem pith. Silva Fennica vol. 23 no. 4 article id 5391. https://doi.org/10.14214/sf.a15549

The shape of Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris L.) knots close to the pith of butt logs was investigated. 1,100 knots were split in a vertical direction, and their shape was measured. Knot diameter and branch angle were calculated at a distance of 40 mm from the pith of the stem. The mean diameter of all the knots in the material was 14 mm, and the branch angle 70°. Regression analysis was used to devise a formula for predicting branch angle on the basis of knot diameter. Knot size and branch angle were negatively correlated. Especially the shape of larger knots was curved. Knots achieved their maximum diameter at distance of 4–5 cm from the stem pith. The branch wood was almost completely situated above the formation point of the branch.

The PDF includes an abstract in Finnish.

  • Pietilä, ORCID ID:E-mail:
article id 5378, category Article
Jukka Pietilä. (1989). Factors affecting the healing-over of pruned Scots pine knots. Silva Fennica vol. 23 no. 2 article id 5378. https://doi.org/10.14214/sf.a15535

The material of the study consisted of 21 Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris L.) trees that had been pruned in the 1930’s and 1940’s. The butt log of the pruned stems was peeled into veneer from which the length and shape of the resin taps were determined. The length of the resin tap was affected in the first place by the knot diameter and the height of the knot along the stem. The length of the resin tap was about 1.5-fold that of the knot diameter. With an increase in the height above the ground of a knot, its length decreases. The resin taps were particularly long on poor sites and in the butt end of the stems, however, the variation in tap length was large both within and between the individual tree stands. The shape of the resin taps is presented in this study by diameter classes. The resin taps studied in the work were longer than those measured in other works. This may be due to the fact that the knots were uncovered by peeling instead of sawing.

The PDF includes an abstract in Finnish.

  • Pietilä, ORCID ID:E-mail:
article id 5255, category Article
Matti Kärkkäinen, Jukka Pietilä, Raili Vihola. (1985). Suomalaisten puulajien iskutaivutuslujuus tuoreena. Silva Fennica vol. 19 no. 4 article id 5255. https://doi.org/10.14214/sf.a15434
English title: Impact bending strength of Finnish tree species in green condition.

There are great impact forces in mechanized harvesting and wood yard in the mills which can cause breaks in timber. The impact strength of timber in green condition was tested in temperatures of +18°C and -18°C using sawn pieces (20 x 20 x 300 mm) of Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris L.), Norway spruce (Picea abies (L.) H. Karst.), birch (Betula pendula Roth and B. pubescens Ehrh.), grey alder (Alnus incana L.) and aspen (Populus tremula L.). In addition, unbarked naturally round sticks (length 300 mm, diameter 15 and 35 mm) of the same species were tested.

The impact strength of round sticks was 1.5–4.4 times as great as that of sawn pieces. The reasons are possibly the avoidance of cell breaks at the surface as well as growth stresses. The frozen samples were clearly weaker than the unfrozen ones. As a rule, the impact bending strength increased with increased density of the species. However, the correlation varied greatly between species. If density was kept constant, an increase in the growth ring width decreased the impact strength. The reason may lie in the fracture mechanism.

The PDF includes a summary in English.

  • Kärkkäinen, ORCID ID:E-mail:
  • Pietilä, ORCID ID:E-mail:
  • Vihola, ORCID ID:E-mail:

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