Current issue: 54(4)

Under compilation: 54(5)

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Silva Fennica 1926-1997
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Acta Forestalia Fennica
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Articles by Hans Pretzsch

Category: Research article

article id 7748, category Research article
Dominik Bayer, Hans Pretzsch. (2017). Reactions to gap emergence: Norway spruce increases growth while European beech features horizontal space occupation – evidence by repeated 3D TLS measurements. Silva Fennica vol. 51 no. 5 article id 7748. https://doi.org/10.14214/sf.7748
Highlights: Analysis of the closure dynamics of a Norway spruce, a European beech and a mixed forest gap by repeated TLS measurements; Norway spruce allocated additional resources predominantly into DBH growth and displayed stronger resilience against mechanical crown damage; European beech allocated resources towards space occupation and displayed higher crown plasticity; Species mixture had no significant effect.

The reach of different tree species’ crowns and the velocity of gap closure during the occupation of canopy gaps resulting from mortality and thinning during stand development determine species-specific competition and productivity within forest stands. However, classical dendrometric methods are rather inaccurate or even incapable of time- and cost-effectively measuring 3D tree structure, crown dynamics and space occupation non-destructively. Therefore, we applied terrestrial laser scanning (TLS) in order to measure the structural dynamics at tree and stand level from gap cutting in 2006 until 2012 in pure and mixed stands of Norway spruce (Picea abies [L.] Karst.) and European beech (Fagus sylvatica L.). In conclusion, our results suggest that Norway spruce invests newly available above-ground resources primarily into DBH as well as biomass growth and indicate a stronger resilience against loss of crown mass induced by mechanical damage. European beech showed a vastly different reaction, investing gains from additional above-ground resources primarily into faster occupation of canopy space. Whether our sample trees were located in pure or mixed groups around the gaps had no significant impact on their behavior during the years after gap cutting.

  • Bayer, Address Technical University of Munich (TUM), Chair for Forest Growth and Yield Science, Hans-Carl-von-Carlowitz-Platz 2, 85354, Freising, Germany ORCID ID: http://orcid.org/0000-0002-2084-3019 E-mail: dominik.bayer@lrz.tu-muenchen.de (email)
  • Pretzsch, Address Technical University of Munich (TUM), Chair for Forest Growth and Yield Science, Hans-Carl-von-Carlowitz-Platz 2, 85354, Freising, Germany ORCID ID:E-mail: hans.pretzsch@lrz.tu-muenchen.de
article id 1393, category Research article
Werner Poschenrieder, Andreas Rais, Jan-Willem G. van de Kuilen, Hans Pretzsch. (2016). Modelling sawn timber volume and strength development at the individual tree level – essential model features by the example of Douglas fir. Silva Fennica vol. 50 no. 1 article id 1393. https://doi.org/10.14214/sf.1393
Highlights: An individual tree timber growth and quality model toolbox was designed; It realistically predicts an increase of bending strength with planting density; Prediction was shown to be based on consideration of essential intrinsic variables; Height‑diameter‑allometry depending on planting density was effective; Consideration of cambial age and knot area ratio was crucial.

We designed a streamlined timber growth and quality model that aims at the effect of stand management on the efficiency of wood resource use. Applying the R based module toolbox to experimental plots of Douglas fir (Pseudotsuga menziesii [Mirb.] Franco) we analysed essential model features for reflecting the influence of planting density on board strength. The current version realistically predicted a significant increase of centre board bending strength at tree age 40 with initial stand density. Model performance gained clear advantage from a) parameterisation of height to diameter allometry as dependent on planting density b) consideration of cambial age and cross‑sectional knot area in board strength computation. Crown shape was less decisive. The model produced a significant effect of planting density even after a whole rotation period of 70 years as well as a realistic spectrum of board bending strength.

  • Poschenrieder, Technische Universität München, Chair of Forest Growth and Yield Science, Hans Carl von Carlowitz Platz 2, 85354 Freising, Germany ORCID ID: http://orcid.org/0000-0002-9028-8583 E-mail: Werner.Poschenrieder@lrz.tum.de (email)
  • Rais, Technische Universität München, Chair of Forest Growth and Yield Science, Hans Carl von Carlowitz Platz 2, 85354 Freising, Germany; Technische Universität München, Holzforschung München, Winzererstrasse 45, 80797 Munich, Germany ORCID ID:E-mail: Andreas.Rais@hfm.tum.de
  • van de Kuilen, Technische Universität München, Holzforschung München, Winzererstrasse 45, 80797 Munich, Germany ORCID ID:E-mail: vandekuilen@hfm.tum.de
  • Pretzsch, Technische Universität München, Chair of Forest Growth and Yield Science, Hans Carl von Carlowitz Platz 2, 85354 Freising, Germany ORCID ID:E-mail: Hans.Pretzsch@lrz.tum.de

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