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Articles by Monika Dering

Category: Research article

article id 9987, category Research article
Monika Dering, Katarzyna Sękiewicz, Grzegorz Iszkuło, Aleksandra Chojnacka, Dominik Tomaszewski, Emilia Pers-Kamczyc, Piotr Karolewski. (2018). Spatial genetic structure and clonal structure of Prunus serotina during invasive spread. Silva Fennica vol. 52 no. 3 article id 9987. https://doi.org/10.14214/sf.9987
Highlights: The spread of Prunus serotina in invaded forests is facilitated by high propagule pressure; The seed shadow overlap prevents strong spatial genetic structure; During colonization of isolated site, a strong spatial genetic structure is produced due to founder effect; Overall clonality in P. serotina was low but may efficiently support seedling bank thus contributing to species invasiveness.

Prunus serotina Ehrh. (black cherry) is one of the most important invaders in the European forests, but existing studies have given limited insight into demo-genetic factors underpinning the process of species invasion. Fine-scale genetic structure (FSGS) may deliver important knowledge on genetics of invasion contributing to efficient management of the alien species. Using eight microsatellites we investigated FSGS, clonal structure and relatedness in four black cherry populations which represented different stages of the invasive spread into Scots pine forests. Three populations were in a continuous forest complex and represented the colonization (Z_1) and established stages (Z_2 and Z_3). To investigate how colonization ability of the species is modified by landscape features, we analyzed an isolated population at colonization stage located in limited forest patch located in an agricultural landscape (R). Populations from continuous forest showed low yet significant positive FSGS with Sp = 0.0068 in Z_1, 0.0054 in Z_2, and 0.0066 in Z_3, while in R spatial structure was the strongest (0.0145). Considerable relatedness noted in population R suggests a dominance of within-population mating and recruitments, low immigration rate and limited seed dispersal, all of which led to the observed strong FSGS. Also, we presume that a founder effect likely involved during colonization of isolated forest patch R led to strong FSGS. In contrary, the seed shadow overlap in the populations from continuous forest prevented strong FSGS and facilitated colonization. Despite of low level of clonality, we argue that it may efficiently support black cherry seedling bank contributing to species invasiveness.

  • Dering, Institute of Dendrology, Polish Academy of Sciences, Parkowa 5, 62-035 Kórnik, Poland ORCID ID:E-mail: mdering@man.poznan.pl (email)
  • Sękiewicz, Institute of Dendrology, Polish Academy of Sciences, Parkowa 5, 62-035 Kórnik, Poland ORCID ID:E-mail: ksekiewicz@man.poznan.pl
  • Iszkuło, Institute of Dendrology, Polish Academy of Sciences, Parkowa 5, 62-035 Kórnik, Poland; Faculty of Biological Sciences, University of Zielona Góra, Prof. Z. Szafrana 1, 65-516 Zielona Góra, Poland ORCID ID:E-mail: iszkulo@man.poznan.pl
  • Chojnacka, Institute of Dendrology, Polish Academy of Sciences, Parkowa 5, 62-035 Kórnik, Poland ORCID ID:E-mail: jagoda900@gmail.com
  • Tomaszewski, Institute of Dendrology, Polish Academy of Sciences, Parkowa 5, 62-035 Kórnik, Poland ORCID ID:E-mail: dominito@man.poznan.pl
  • Pers-Kamczyc, Institute of Dendrology, Polish Academy of Sciences, Parkowa 5, 62-035 Kórnik, Poland ORCID ID:E-mail: epk@man.poznan.pl
  • Karolewski, Institute of Dendrology, Polish Academy of Sciences, Parkowa 5, 62-035 Kórnik, Poland ORCID ID:E-mail: pkarolew@man.poznan.pl
article id 240, category Research article
Monika Dering, Andrzej Lewandowski, Krzysztof Ufnalski, Aleksandra Kedzierska. (2008). How far to the east was the migration of white oaks from the Iberian refugium? Silva Fennica vol. 42 no. 3 article id 240. https://doi.org/10.14214/sf.240
The goal of this study was to investigate the postglacial recolonization pathways of the white oaks Quercus robur and Quercus petrea in Poland, and especially to evaluate the impact of Iberian refugium in this part of Europe. Chloroplast DNA polymorphism of 310 individuals older than 200 years was analyzed. Six haplotypes in total were found to differentiate three maternal lineages: the Balkan (haplotypes 4, 5, and 7), the Apennine (haplotypes 1 and 2), and the Iberian (haplotype 12). The most abundant were members of the Balkan (71.5% of all samples) and the Apennine lineage (23.1%), and only 5.4% of individuals were of Iberian origin. The geographic distribution of the three lineages is clearly structured. The northernmost territories of Poland are occupied by Apennine (haplotype 1) and Iberian (haplotype 12) lineages, whereas samples in central and southern Poland represents the Balkan lineage. The population structure might be the result of competitive colonization among lineages after migration from different refugia. It is likely that colonization of northernmost parts of Poland by the Balkan lineage was halted or at least hampered due to the arrival of the Apennine populations. The most significant result of this study concerns the presence and status of the Iberian lineage in Poland, which is most likely of natural origin.
  • Dering, Polish Academy of Sciences, Institute of Dendrology, Parkowa 5, Kornik, Poland ORCID ID:E-mail: usnea@o2.pl (email)
  • Lewandowski, Polish Academy of Sciences, Institute of Dendrology, Parkowa 5, Kornik, Poland ORCID ID:E-mail:
  • Ufnalski, Polish Academy of Sciences, Institute of Dendrology, Parkowa 5, Kornik, Poland ORCID ID:E-mail:
  • Kedzierska, Polish Academy of Sciences, Institute of Dendrology, Parkowa 5, Kornik, Poland ORCID ID:E-mail:

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