Current issue: 54(2)

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Silva Fennica 1926-1997
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Acta Forestalia Fennica
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Articles by Laura Pikkarainen

Category: Research article

article id 10243, category Research article
Laura Pikkarainen, Jaana Luoranen, Antti Kilpeläinen, Teppo Oijala, Heli Peltola. (2020). Comparison of planting success in one-year-old spring, summer and autumn plantings of Norway spruce and Scots pine under boreal conditions. Silva Fennica vol. 54 no. 1 article id 10243. https://doi.org/10.14214/sf.10243
Highlights: In Norway spruce, 84% of all plantings were successful, whereas in Scots pine, the corresponding number was 52%; The major reason for poor planting results was poor work quality; An extended planting season is possible for Norway spruce in southern and central Finland; In Scots pine, there are still large uncertainties in the success of summer and autumn plantings.

In Nordic countries, tree planting of seedlings is mainly performed during spring and early summer. Interest has increased in extending the planting window throughout the unfrozen growing season. This study compared the success of one-year-old spring, summer and autumn plantings in practical forestry in Norway spruce (Picea abies (L.) Karst.) and Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris L.) in southern and central Finland. Planting success was based on the number of viable seedlings per hectare relative to a species-specific target density. The influence of different factors to poor planting results were determined, including quality of site preparation and planting, and sources of natural damage. Overall, in Norway spruce, 85, 69 and 84% and in Scots pine 53, 55 and 40% of spring, summer and autumn plantings succeeded. In Norway spruce, the planting results were consistent between the southern and central regions, whereas in Scots pine, the success was slightly lower in the south. The poor work quality and a low density of appropriate planting spots, contributed to poor planting results, regardless of planting season, region or tree species. Considering different damages, especially mammal damage contributed to the failure of Scots pine spring plantings, whereas in summer plantings, corresponding single failure reason could not be identified. Based on our findings, extending the planting season of Norway spruce could be recommended in both regions. For Scots pine, there is still significant uncertainty about the success of summer and autumn plantings, partially due to the limited number of plantings available for analyses.

  • Pikkarainen, School of Forest Sciences, University of Eastern Finland, Yliopistonkatu 7, FI-80100 Joensuu, Finland ORCID ID:E-mail: laura.pikkarainen@uef.fi (email)
  • Luoranen, Natural Resources Institute Finland (Luke), Production Systems, Neulaniementie 5, FI-70210 Kuopio, Finland ORCID ID:E-mail: jaana.luoranen@luke.fi
  • Kilpeläinen, School of Forest Sciences, University of Eastern Finland, Yliopistonkatu 7, FI-80100 Joensuu, Finland ORCID ID:E-mail: antti.kilpelainen@uef.fi
  • Oijala, Metsä Group, Metsä Forest, Kuormaajantie 7, FI-40320 Jyväskylä, Finland ORCID ID:E-mail: teppo.oijala@metsagroup.com
  • Peltola, School of Forest Sciences, University of Eastern Finland, Yliopistonkatu 7, FI-80100 Joensuu, Finland ORCID ID:E-mail: heli.peltola@uef.fi

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