Current issue: 55(3)

Under compilation: 55(4)

Scopus CiteScore 2019: 3.1
Scopus ranking of open access forestry journals: 6th
PlanS compliant
Silva Fennica 1926-1997
1990-1997
1980-1989
1970-1979
1960-1969
Acta Forestalia Fennica
1953-1968
1933-1952
1913-1932

Articles by Juha Kaitera

Category: Research article

article id 10446, category Research article
Juha Kaitera, Tuomas Kauppila, Jarkko Hantula. (2021). Assessment of the potential of Norway-spruce-seed-orchard associated plants to serve as alternate hosts of Thekopsora areolata. Silva Fennica vol. 55 no. 2 article id 10446. https://doi.org/10.14214/sf.10446
Highlights: Prunus is the only alternate host of cherry-spruce rust identified in this study; Cherry-spruce rust does not infect plants that belong to common ground vegetation flora in Finnish Norway spruce seed orchards; Spores from different Finnish cherry-spruce rust populations are similarly pathogenic on Prunus; Disease control should be focused only on Prunus in seed orchards.

The alternate host range of cherry-spruce rust is poorly studied although such information could be important in protecting spruce seed orchards from infections. Pathogenicity of cherry-spruce rust, Thekopsora areolata (Fr.) Magnus, was investigated on potential alternate host species in a greenhouse and in a laboratory in Finland. Five common species of Ericaceae, Vaccinium myrtillus L., V. uliginosum L., V. vitis-idaea L., Empetrum nigrum L. and Arctostaphylos uva-ursi (L.) Spreng, were inoculated in the greenhouse using aeciospores from seven Norway spruce [Picea abies (L.) H. Karst.] seed orchards suffering from T. areolata in 2018. In addition, young detached leaves of Vaccinium spp. and 17 other plant species of ground vegetation from eight Norway spruce seed orchards were inoculated with aeciospores from six seed orchards in the laboratory in 2019. Also, young leaves of Prunus padus L. trees growing within the seed orchards or close to them were inoculated as controls. None of the inoculated leaves of the potential alternate hosts formed uredinia either in the greenhouse or in the laboratory. In contrast, leaves of P. padus from the seed orchards were infected by the six spore sources from six seed orchards and produced uredinia. As T. areolata spores were able to infect only P. padus, but not the other tested species belonging to ground flora, it was concluded that T. areolata disperses only via Prunus spp. in Finnish seed orchards.

  • Kaitera, Natural Resources Institute Finland (Luke), Natural Resources, FI-90570 Oulu, Finland ORCID ID:E-mail: juha.kaitera@luke.fi (email)
  • Kauppila, Botanical Gardens, University of Oulu, FI-90014 Oulu, Finland ORCID ID:E-mail: tuomas.kauppila@oulu.fi
  • Hantula, Natural Resources Institute Finland (Luke), Natural Resources, FI-00790 Helsinki, Finland ORCID ID:E-mail: jarkko.hantula@luke.fi
article id 10422, category Research article
Juha Kaitera, Jouni Karhu. (2021). Temperature range for germination of Thekopsora areolata aeciospores from Finnish Norway spruce seed orchards. Silva Fennica vol. 55 no. 1 article id 10422. https://doi.org/10.14214/sf.10422
Highlights: Cherry-spruce rust was able to germinate at very low temperature (6 °C) close to the temperature when thermal growth starts; Optimum spore germination occurred between 15–24 °C; High temperature of 30 °C drastically reduced germination; Temperature had the most significant effect on germination, while spore source had less significant effect and agar media a non-significant effect on germination in a Fixed Effects model.

Cherry-spruce rust caused by Thekopsora areolata (Fr.) Magnus is a serious cone pathogen of Norway spruce [Picea abies (L.) Karst.]. The rust causes great economical losses in seed orchards specialized in the production of high quality seeds. Germination range of T. areolata aeciospores from rust populations (spore sources) in seven Finnish Norway spruce seed orchards was tested on water agar and malt agar at nine temperatures varying between 6–30 °C. The temperature range of spore germination was high varying between 6 °C and 27 °C, while germination was retarded at 30 °C. The peak in germination rate of all spore sources occurred between 15–24 °C. In a model with fixed effects of agar media, temperature and spore source, temperature had the most significant effect on germination. Spore source had a less significant effect, while agar media had a non-significant effect on germination. The rust was able to germinate at low temperatures corresponding to temperatures when the thermal growing season starts at 5 °C in the spring. As spores from cones from both the spruce canopy and the ground showed very similar germination ranges, it indicated the great capacity of all spores of the rust to germinate early in the spring. Hot temperatures with over 30 °C drastically reduced germination of the rust.

  • Kaitera, Natural Resources Institute Finland (Luke), Natural resources and bioproduction, Paavo Havaksentie 3, FI-90014 University of Oulu, Finland ORCID ID:E-mail: juha.kaitera@luke.fi (email)
  • Karhu, Natural Resources Institute Finland (Luke), Natural resources and bioproduction, Paavo Havaksentie 3, FI-90014 University of Oulu, Finland ORCID ID:E-mail: jouni.karhu@luke.fi
article id 149, category Research article
Juha Kaitera, Heikki Nuorteva. (2010). Effects of Melampyrum extracts on the growth of axenic cultures of Cronartium flaccidum and Peridermium pini. Silva Fennica vol. 44 no. 2 article id 149. https://doi.org/10.14214/sf.149
For 3–6 months, mycelial colonies cultured from 5 isolates of each of two pine stem rusts (Cronartium flaccidum and Peridermium pini) were grown on nutrient-rich agar supplemented with Melampyrum extracts. Non-autoclaved extracts of M. pratense significantly reduced the growth of P. pini. The growth of C. flaccidum isolates was slightly stimulated after the second month of incubation but after that was inhibited during incubation months 4–6. We observed considerable variation in colony growth, a significant component of which was explained by incubation time, isolate, growth medium and their interaction. Rust species (C. flaccidum or P. pini) was not an important factor in growth variation. While sterilized extracts of M. pratense, M. sylvaticum and M. nemorosum did not significantly affect growth, colonies of C. flaccidum were slightly stimulated, whereas colonies of P. pini were slightly inhibited. Generally, isolates of P. pini grew better and showed a slower rate of degeneration than C. flaccidum on all media.
  • Kaitera, Finnish Forest Research Institute, Northern Finland Regional Unit, FI-91500 Muhos, Finland ORCID ID:E-mail: juha.kaitera@metla.fi (email)
  • Nuorteva, Finnish Forest Research Institute, Southern Finland Regional Unit, FI-01301 Vantaa, Finland ORCID ID:E-mail:
article id 641, category Research article
Juha Kaitera. (2000). Analysis of Cronartium flaccidum lesion development on pole-stage Scots pines. Silva Fennica vol. 34 no. 1 article id 641. https://doi.org/10.14214/sf.641
Historical and current lesion development and sporulation of Cronartium flaccidum was investigated in a stand of artificially seeded pole-stage Pinus sylvestris in northern Finland. An average of 6.5 lesions developed per infected tree, most of them occurring on a minority (25%) of the trees. During the monitoring period of five years, fresh aecia appeared mainly in 7–10-year-old shoots, the age of the shoots bearing aecia varying between 3–20 years. Aecia appeared for the first time most frequently in 5–10-year-old shoots. Infection waves occurred, whereas lesions were formed most frequently in shoots formed in various years through the 1980s. After the lesions started to sporulate, sporulation in most lesions that finished sporulating during the monitoring period lasted for 1–2 years. The aecia in between 47% and 59% of the infected shoots developed annually over a longer length in proximal direction than in distal direction next to the previous year’s infection. The aecia-bearing distal part of the shoot was longer in between 19% and 37% of the shoots.
  • Kaitera, Finnish Forest Research Institute, Rovaniemi Research Station, P.O. Box 16, FIN-96301 Rovaniemi, Finland ORCID ID:E-mail: juha.kaitera@metla.fi (email)

Category: Article

article id 5402, category Article
Risto Jalkanen, Juha Kaitera. (1994). Gremmeniella abietina produces pycnidia in cankers of living shoots with green needles on Scots pine. Silva Fennica vol. 28 no. 2 article id 5402. https://doi.org/10.14214/sf.a9168

A Gremmeniella abietina (Lagerb.) race of type A was found to produce pycnidia in cankers of previous year’s shoots (1991) on branches of Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris L.) bearing green needles and living buds in the current-year shoots (1992) with no apparent symptoms of infection by G. abietina. The restricted colonization of green shoots by G. abietina, with only restricted canker development, may indicate that older, slow-growing natural Scots pines of the northern boreal forests resists the fungus well. However, the ability of the fungus to survive and even sporulate in such cankers indicates one way of surviving over consecutive years otherwise unfavourable for it.

  • Jalkanen, ORCID ID:E-mail:
  • Kaitera, ORCID ID:E-mail:
article id 5397, category Article
Juha Kaitera, Risto Jalkanen. (1994). Old and fresh Gremmeniella abietina damage on Scots pine in eastern Lapland in 1992. Silva Fennica vol. 28 no. 2 article id 5397. https://doi.org/10.14214/sf.a9166

Damage on Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris L.) caused by Gremmeniella abietina (Lagerb.) Morelet was assessed in the summer of 1992 in 67 stands in eastern Lapland. The area and severity of damage were smaller and lighter than had earlier been estimated and occurred especially in stands in the first-thinning stage or in middle-age. Significant new infection of 1991 occurred in stands previously heavily infected by G. abietina near Kemihaara river, lake Naruska, the Naruska river, the Tuntsa river and lake Vilma. Fresh damage occurred mainly in the lower or middle parts of the Scots pine canopies.

  • Kaitera, ORCID ID:E-mail:
  • Jalkanen, ORCID ID:E-mail:

Register
Click this link to register for Silva Fennica submission and tracking system.
Log in
If you are a registered user, log in to save your selected articles for later access.
Contents alert
Sign up to receive alerts of new content
Your selected articles

Committee on Publication Ethics A Trusted Community-Governed Archive