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Silva Fennica 1926-1997
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Acta Forestalia Fennica
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Articles by Erik Andersson

Category: Research article

article id 689, category Research article
Erik W. Andersson, Kostas A. Spanos, Timothy J. Mullin, Dag Lindgren. (1998). Phenotypic selection compared to restricted combined index selection for many generations. Silva Fennica vol. 32 no. 2 article id 689. https://doi.org/10.14214/sf.689
A breeding population has been subjected to repeated selection and crossing by simulation. Unrestricted phenotypic selection and restricted combined index selection were compared at the same effective number for five generations. Results show that phenotypic selection often achieves the gain and diversity possible to achieve by combined index selection but the relative efficiency is different for different family sizes and heritabilities. When phenotypic selection was compared with restricted combined index method at low heritabilities, both methods performed almost equally in terms of gain at the same effective number in small family sizes, although in large families, phenotypic selection was less efficient. At high heritabilities phenotypic selection was as efficient as combined index selection. Phenotypic selection was more efficient in conserving additive variance than combined index selection over five generations compared at the same gain and effective number. The introduction of a dominance component to the total variance had little effect. An increased breeding population size by a factor of ten resulted in an increased additive gain by app. 15%. The conclusion is that even though combined index selection is superior in identifying and extracting the potential for breeding achievements, it is generally not performing better than mass selection when compared at the same effective population size in small families.
  • Andersson, Department of Forest Genetics and Plant Physiology, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, S-901 83, Umeå, Sweden ORCID ID:E-mail: erik.andersson@genfys.slu.se (email)
  • Spanos, N.AG.RE.F.-Forest Research Institute, 57006 Vassilika, Thessaloniki, Greece ORCID ID:E-mail:
  • Mullin, Genesis Forest Science Canada Inc., C.P. 64 Succursale Haute-Ville, Québec, QC G1R 4M8 Canada ORCID ID:E-mail:
  • Lindgren, Department of Forest Genetics and Plant Physiology, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, S-901 83, Umeå, Sweden ORCID ID:E-mail:

Category: Research note

article id 92, category Research note
Adam Felton, Erik Andersson, David Ventorp, Matts Lindbladh. (2011). A comparison of avian diversity in spruce monocultures and spruce-birch polycultures in southern Sweden. Silva Fennica vol. 45 no. 5 article id 92. https://doi.org/10.14214/sf.92
The replacement of some spruce monocultures with stands composed of planted Norway spruce (Picea abies) and naturally regenerated birch (Betula spp.) has a range of potential benefits, but the implications for biodiversity are generally unknown. Here we conduct a paired replicated study in southern Sweden of the avian biodiversity found within Norway spruce monocultures, and within Norway spruce stands possessing approximately 20% birch. Our research leads us to three findings. First, avian diversity was significantly higher in the spruce–birch polycultures. Second, spruce–birch polycultures exclusively attracted broadleaf-associated bird species and retained the majority of conifer-associated bird species found in the spruce monocultures. Third, avian biodiversity within the spruce–birch polycultures did not incorporate threatened taxa. We suggest that in addition to the apparent benefits for stand level diversity, widespread use of spruce–birch polycultures could provide a means of softening the matrix for broadleaved-associated species, while concurrently providing an increased broadleaf base from which future conservation actions could be implemented. Our results are relevant to multi-use forestry, and recent policy initiatives by forest certification agencies which aim to increase broadleaf-associated biodiversity within conifer-dominated production forest landscapes.
  • Felton, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Southern Swedish Forest Research Centre, Alnarp, Sweden ORCID ID:E-mail: adam.felton@ess.slu.se (email)
  • Andersson, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Southern Swedish Forest Research Centre, Alnarp, Sweden ORCID ID:E-mail:
  • Ventorp, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Southern Swedish Forest Research Centre, Alnarp, Sweden ORCID ID:E-mail:
  • Lindbladh, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Southern Swedish Forest Research Centre, Alnarp, Sweden ORCID ID:E-mail:

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