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Articles by Julio Javier Diez

Category: Research article

article id 9905, category Research article
Mercedes M. Fernandez, Diana Bezos, Julio J. Diez. (2018). Fungi associated with necrotic galls of Dryocosmus kuriphilus (Hymenoptera: Cynipidae) in northern Spain. Silva Fennica vol. 52 no. 3 article id 9905. https://doi.org/10.14214/sf.9905
Highlights: Presence of Dryocosmus kuriphilus in Northern Spain; The mycobiota associated to necrotic galls was studied for the first time; 7 fungal species were identified; The entomopathogenic fungi found could be use as potential biological control agents; Gnomomiopsis smithogilvyi, Fusarium oxysporum and F. avenaceum known by their toxicity against the insect, were found.

The Asian chestnut gall wasp (ACGW), Dryocosmus kuriphilus Yasumatsu (Hymenoptera: Cynipidae) is one of the most important pests in Castanea species worldwide. In 2012, it was found for the first time in Catalonia (Spain) and a year later, in the north of Spain (Cantabria). Today, it is present in 14 Spanish provinces. In search of biological control against the ACGW, several authors have previously found the relationship between the presence of some Fusarium Link species in necrotic galls and wasp mortality due to the production of different types of wall-degrading enzymes and entomopathogenic mycotoxins. The objective of this study was to investigate the mycobiota associated with necrotic galls to find interesting perspectives for biological control of the ACGW. For this purpose, in 2014, 119 necrotic galls of Castanea sativa Miller were plated to isolate and identify the associated fungi. The fungal isolates were identified by the morphology of the fruiting bodies and DNA analyses. From necrotic galls, 7 species of fungi were identified. Of these, we highlight three species of Fusarium Link as well as the presence of Gnomoniopsis smithogilvyi Shuttlew, Liew & Guest due to its toxic capacity. Further studies are required to verify the effectiveness of these fungal species as biocontrol agents against the ACGW.

  • Fernandez, Dpt. of Agroforestry Sciences, ETSIIAA, University of Valladolid, Av. Madrid 50, 34071 Palencia, Spain; Sustainable Forest Management Research Institute UVa-INIA, ETSIIAA, 34071 Palencia, Spain ORCID ID: http://orcid.org/0000-0002-1646-5027 E-mail: mffernan@agro.uva.es (email)
  • Bezos, Sustainable Forest Management Research Institute UVa-INIA, ETSIIAA, 34071 Palencia, Spain ORCID ID:E-mail: dianabezos@yahoo.es
  • Diez, Sustainable Forest Management Research Institute UVa-INIA, ETSIIAA, 34071 Palencia, Spain; Dpt. of Plant Production and Forest Resources, University of Valladolid, Av. Madrid 50, 34071 Palencia, Spain ORCID ID:E-mail: jdcasero@pvs.uva.es
article id 1043, category Research article
Jorge Martín-García, Luc Barbaro, Julio Javier Diez, Hervé Jactel. (2013). Contribution of poplar plantations to bird conservation in riparian landscapes. Silva Fennica vol. 47 no. 4 article id 1043. https://doi.org/10.14214/sf.1043
Highlights: Poplar plantations should not be used as surrogate habitat for native riparian forests with the aim of preserving bird species diversity; Native riparian forests should be preserved or restored as far as possible; Bird communities occurring in poplar plantations can still accommodate rich communities of forest bird species, providing that suitable management is applied at local and landscape levels.
In Mediterranean areas, riparian zones are particularly important for maintaining biodiversity. Nevertheless, the native vegetation in these zones has been modified or lost at an alarming rate during the last decades. The main objective of this study was to investigate the influence of poplar plantations on bird diversity in riparian zones, in order to estimate the ecological implications of a substantial expansion of poplar plantations. Breeding birds were sampled by the point-count method in twenty-four poplar plantations of I-214 clone, according to a factorial design combining stand age and understory management. Furthermore, the three native riparian forests remaining in the study area were also surveyed. Explanatory variables included (1) dendrometric, (2) understory and (3) landscape variables within six different radii of circular buffers. The species richness and abundance index were higher in riparian forests than in poplar plantations. Landscape variables (percentage of poplar plantations in the surrounding landscape) strongly influenced bird diversity in poplar plantations. Furthermore, at the local scale, understory cover was also a key factor in shaping bird assemblages. This suggests that poplar plantations should not be used as surrogates for native forests. Nevertheless, poplar plantations can still accommodate rich communities of forest bird species, providing that suitable management is applied at local and landscape levels.
  • Martín-García, Sustainable Forest Management Research Institute, University of Valladolid – INIA, Avenida Madrid, 57, 34004 Palencia, Spain ORCID ID:E-mail: jorgemg@pvs.uva.es (email)
  • Barbaro, NRA, UMR 1202 BIOGECO, 69 Route d’Arcachon, F-33612 Cestas cedex, France ORCID ID:E-mail: luc@pierroton.inra.fr
  • Diez, Sustainable Forest Management Research Institute, University of Valladolid – INIA, Avenida Madrid, 57, 34004 Palencia, Spain ORCID ID:E-mail: jdcasero@pvs.uva.es
  • Jactel, NRA, UMR 1202 BIOGECO, 69 Route d’Arcachon, F-33612 Cestas cedex, France; Université de Bordeaux, UMR 1202, Bordeaux, F-33000 France ORCID ID:E-mail: herve.jactel@pierroton.inra.fr
article id 42, category Research article
Pablo Martínez-Álvarez, Fernando Manuel Alves-Santos, Julio Javier Diez. (2012). In vitro and in vivo interactions between Trichoderma viride and Fusarium circinatum. Silva Fennica vol. 46 no. 3 article id 42. https://doi.org/10.14214/sf.42
Fusarium circinatum, a fungus that causes pitch canker disease, has been present in Europe since at least 2003, when it was detected in northern Spain and found to be producing severe damage in tree nurseries and pine plantations. In this study, we tested a method of biological control of the disease with Trichoderma viride, a fungal species successfully used against many other pathogens. In vitro and in vivo assays were carried out to test the efficacy of this antagonist in controlling F. circinatum. The T. viride isolate exerted a significant effect on the growth of F. circinatum in the in vitro assay, reducing the length of the pathogen colony by half. However, although we tested three different concentrations of the T. viride spore solution, no clear conclusions were obtained with regard to the effects on the Pinus radiata seedlings. To our knowledge, this is the first study carried out with the aim of using Trichoderma spp. to control pitch canker disease.
  • Martínez-Álvarez, Sustainable Forest Management Research Institute, University of Valladolid – INIA, Avenida de Madrid 44, 34071 Palencia, Spain ORCID ID:E-mail: pmtnez@pvs.uva.es (email)
  • Alves-Santos, Sustainable Forest Management Research Institute, University of Valladolid – INIA, Avenida de Madrid 44, 34071 Palencia, Spain ORCID ID:E-mail:
  • Diez, Sustainable Forest Management Research Institute, University of Valladolid – INIA, Avenida de Madrid 44, 34071 Palencia, Spain ORCID ID:E-mail:
article id 40, category Research article
Jorge Martín-García, Elba Espiga, Valentín Pando, Julio Javier Diez. (2011). Factors influencing endophytic communities in poplar plantations. Silva Fennica vol. 45 no. 2 article id 40. https://doi.org/10.14214/sf.40
The fungal species associated with leaves and twigs from stands of Populus x euramericana in northern Spain were studied with the aim of evaluating the effects of several factors on endophytic communities in these plantations. Endophyte assemblages were analysed in 12 poplar plantations (clone I-214), chosen according to a factorial scheme with two factors: age and site quality. Crown condition, dendrometric variables and foliar nutrients were recorded in each sampled tree to evaluate their effects on endophytic communities. Fungal species richness and relative isolation frequency (RIF) were higher in young stands than in adult stands. Moreover, the age-related differences depended on site quality, with the lowest richness levels observed in adult stands located in poor sites. At stand level, endophyte assemblages varied among stands according to site quality and, to a lesser extent, stand age. On the other hand, crown discoloration, total height and foliar concentrations of iron and zinc may be key indicators of endophytic communities in poplar plantations, at tree level.
  • Martín-García, Sustainable Forest Management Research Institute, University of Valladolid – INIA, Avenida de Madrid 57, 34004 Palencia, Spain, and Forestry Engineering, University of Extremadura, Plasencia, Spain ORCID ID:E-mail: jorgemg@pvs.uva.es (email)
  • Espiga, Sustainable Forest Management Research Institute, University of Valladolid – INIA, Palencia, Spain ORCID ID:E-mail:
  • Pando, Statistics and Operations Research Department, University of Valladolid, Spain ORCID ID:E-mail:
  • Diez, Sustainable Forest Management Research Institute, University of Valladolid – INIA, Palencia, Spain ORCID ID:E-mail:
article id 137, category Research article
Alberto Bueno, Julio J. Diez, Mercedes M. Fernández. (2010). Ophiostomatoid fungi transported by Ips sexdentatus (Coleoptera; Scolytidae) in Pinus pinaster in NW Spain. Silva Fennica vol. 44 no. 3 article id 137. https://doi.org/10.14214/sf.137
Ips sexdentatus (Coleoptera; Scolytidae) is one of the main vectors of ophiostomatoid blue stain fungi that can cause mortality of healthy conifers. For this reason, our objective was to identify the fungal species carried by this bark beetle in Maritime pine (Pinus pinaster) in north-western Spain. We collected insects from naturally infected pines placed them on malt extract agar (MEA) and left to walk freely on culture plates. Plant tissues (phloem and xylem) from adult pines were cultivated in moist chambers and also on MEA. At the same time, we inoculated pine logs with living insects in the laboratory. Four ophiostomatoid fungi appeared: Ophiostoma ips, Ophiostoma brunneo-ciliatum, Ceratocystiopsis minuta and Ophiostoma sp., as well as Graphium and Sporothrix imperfect stages. Moreover there were seven saprophytic species: Penicillium sp., Trichoderma sp., Verticillium sp., Mucor sp., Aspergillus niger, Gliocladium viride and Scopulariopsis brevicaulis, and the pathogenic Ophiostoma ips. The fructification percentage of the ophiostomatoid species was low, however; its imperfect stage Sporothrix/Hyalorhinocladiella produced high quantity of conidiophores.
  • Bueno, University of Valladolid, Dept of Agroforestry Sciences, Palencia, Spain ORCID ID:E-mail:
  • Diez, University of Valladolid, Dept of Agroforestry Sciences, Palencia, Spain ORCID ID:E-mail:
  • Fernández, University of Valladolid, Dept of Agroforestry Sciences, Palencia, Spain ORCID ID:E-mail: mffernan@agro.uva.es (email)

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