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Silva Fennica 1926-1997
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1960-1969
Acta Forestalia Fennica
1953-1968
1933-1952
1913-1932

Articles by Jan Stenlid

Category: Research article

article id 672, category Research article
Rimvydas Vasiliauskas, Jan Stenlid. (1998). Spread of Stereum sanguinolentum vegetative compatibility groups within a stand and within stems of Picea abies. Silva Fennica vol. 32 no. 4 article id 672. https://doi.org/10.14214/sf.672
A total of 57 naturally established Stereum sanguinolentum isolates was obtained from artificially wounded Picea abies stems in a forest area of 2 ha in Lithuania. Somatic incompatibility tests revealed 27 vegetative compatibility groups (VCGs) that contained 1–10 isolates. There was no spatial clustering of S. sanguinolentum VCGs within the forest area. The extent of S. sanguinolentum decay was analysed in 48 P. abies stems, 9–26 cm in diameter at breast height. Within 7 years of wounding, the length of S. sanguinolentum decay column in stems was 107–415 cm (291.5 ± 77.3 cm on average), lateral spread of the fungus at the butt was 38–307 cm2 (142.3 ± 66.8 cm2) and decayed proportion of the stem cross-section at the wound site (the butt) was 3–84% (36.8 ± 19.7%). In average, S. sanguinolentum VCG that infected 10 trees exhibited more slow growth inside the stem than VCGs that infected only one tree, and vertical growth varied to a greater extent within this VCG than among different VCGs. Correlation between stem diameter and vertical spread of S. sanguinolentum was not significant (r = –0.103). Despite uniformity of debarked area on all stems 7 years ago (300 cm2), open wound sizes on individual trees at the time of study were between 97–355 cm2 (215.1 ± 59.2 cm2) indicating large differences in wound healing capacity.
  • Vasiliauskas, Department of Plant Protection, Lithuanian University of Agriculture, LT-4324 Kaunas, Lithuania ORCID ID:E-mail:
  • Stenlid, Department of Forest Mycology & Pathology, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, P.O. Box 7026, S-750 07 Uppsala, Sweden ORCID ID:E-mail:

Category: Review article

article id 249, category Review article
Rimvydas Vasaitis, Jan Stenlid, Iben M. Thomsen, Pia Barklund, Anders Dahlberg. (2008). Stump removal to control root rot in forest stands. A literature study. Silva Fennica vol. 42 no. 3 article id 249. https://doi.org/10.14214/sf.249
Tree stumps are expected to be increasingly used for energy production in Fennoscandia, thus environmental consequences of stump removal from forest land must be assessed. Aim of this work was to compile available data on the efficacy of stump removal in eradication of root rot fungi (Heterobasidion, Armillaria, and Phellinus), and to review its potential impacts on establishment and productivity of next forest generation. Site disturbance and some technical and economical aspects are discussed, and needs for future research outlined in northern European context. The review demonstrates that stump removal from clear-felled forest areas in most cases results in, a) reduction of root rot in the next forest generation, b) improved seedling establishment, and c) increased tree growth and stand productivity. Observed disturbances caused to a site by stumping operations are normally acceptable. The available data strongly suggests that possibly many (if achievable, all) rot-containing stumps must be removed during harvesting of stumps. Provided equal availability, the priority should be given for stump removal from root rot-infested forest areas, instead of healthy ones. As most studies were done in North America and Britain, several questions must be yet answered under Fennoscandian conditions: a) if and to which extent the conventional stump removal for biofuel on clear-felled sites could reduce the occurrence of Heterobasidion and Armillaria in the next forest generation, b) what impact is it likely to have on survival of replanted tree seedlings, and c) what consequences will there be for growth and productivity of next forest generation.
  • Vasaitis, Department of Forest Mycology & Pathology, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, P.O. Box 7026, SE-75007 Uppsala, Sweden ORCID ID:E-mail: rimvys.vasaitis@mykopat.slu.se (email)
  • Stenlid, Department of Forest Mycology & Pathology, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, P.O. Box 7026, SE-75007 Uppsala, Sweden ORCID ID:E-mail:
  • Thomsen, Forest & Landscape, University of Copenhagen, Hoersholm Kongevej 11, DK-2970 Hoersholm, Denmark ORCID ID:E-mail:
  • Barklund, Department of Forest Mycology & Pathology, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, P.O. Box 7026, SE-75007 Uppsala, Sweden ORCID ID:E-mail:
  • Dahlberg, Swedish Species Information Centre, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, P.O. Box 7007, SE-75007 Uppsala, Sweden ORCID ID:E-mail:

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