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Silva Fennica 1926-1997
1990-1997
1980-1989
1970-1979
1960-1969
Acta Forestalia Fennica
1953-1968
1933-1952
1913-1932

Silva Fennica 1926-1997 vol. 1 no. 3 | 1967

Category: Article

article id 4755, category Article
Unto Väisänen. (1967). Puun korjuu. Silva Fennica vol. 1 no. 3 article id 4755. https://doi.org/10.14214/sf.a14539
English title: Book review: Harvesting Timber Crops.
Keywords: book review

This article is a book review of a textbook ’Harvesting Timber Crops’ by A.E. Wackerman, W.D. Hagenstein and A.S. Mitchell.

  • Väisänen, ORCID ID:E-mail:
article id 4754, category Article
Matti Leikola. (1967). Havaintoja erään hoidetun männikön tuulisuhteista. Silva Fennica vol. 1 no. 3 article id 4754. https://doi.org/10.14214/sf.a14538
English title: Observations on wind conditions in a managed Scots pine stand.

An explorative study on wind conditions in a well-managed Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris L.) stand was made in Southern Finland. The wind velocity was recorded continually with two cup anomometers from April to August, 1964. The two levels used were 2 m and 9 m. The wind velocity was lower at 2 m than within the canopy at 9 m. The dependence on the absolute wind velocity at 9 metres was logarithmic. The wind velocity did affect the difference between daily minimum temperatures at the two levels; the difference in the maximum temperatures was affected only in May and August.

The PDF includes a summary in English.

  • Leikola, ORCID ID:E-mail:
article id 4753, category Article
Helge Johnsson. (1967). Olika vägar för rasmässig förbättring av vårt skogsodlingsmaterial. Silva Fennica vol. 1 no. 3 article id 4753. https://doi.org/10.14214/sf.a14537
English title: Different ways of genetic improvement of forest trees in Scandinavia.

Transfer of southern provenances of trees to the north leads to an increased growth until the limit of hardiness is exceeded, which may be utilized in practical forestry. Selection from certain local provenances are important both for the immediate supply of seed and on a somewhat longer view. A certain degree of improvement can be achieved by avoiding minus regions and concentrating seed collection on better areas. Also, seeds can be collected from the best stands only, and by accepting only seed from the best trees of such stands. The selection can be strengthened considerably by production of seed orchards. The seed production is based on a small number of trees of particular superiority that are reproduced vegetatively. The clones are planted in an orchard, which pollinate each other.

Hybridization of two different provenances might result in an increased capacity of production. Such hybridized seed can be produced in orchards established, for instance, as a combination of selection and hybridization orchards. As regards the major Scandinavian tree species there are only small prospects of advancement through species hybridization. The method available at present for efficient racial improvement of our forest trees is individual selection in connection with seed production in orchards. In special cases, however, other methods such as transfer of provenances, provenance hybridization, species hybridization, and polyploidization will result in considerable progress.

The PDF includes a summary in English.

  • Johnsson, ORCID ID:E-mail:
article id 4752, category Article
T. T. Kozlowski, S. Sasaki, J. H. Torrie. (1967). Effects of temperature on phytotoxicity of monuron, picloram, CDEC, EPTC, CDAA, and sesone to young pine seedlings. Silva Fennica vol. 1 no. 3 article id 4752. https://doi.org/10.14214/sf.a14536

The apparent toxicity of soil-incorporated monuron, picloram, CDEC, EPTC, CDAA, and sesone to young Pinus resinosa Ait. seedlings was studied over a temperature range of 10–30 °C in growth chambers. The herbicides were first applied to the surface of autoclaved soil at 1 1b/A and later mixed into the soil. Thereafter pine seeds were planted and subsequent seedling development was studied. The effect of CDEC, EPTC, CDAA, and sesone were also studied at dosages of 2 and 3 1b/A (soil surface basis).

Under the conditions of this study, picloram and monuron were persistent in the soil and toxic to pine seedlings, whereas CDEC, EPTC, CDAA, and sesone appeared to be non-toxic. However, the apparent lack of phytotoxicity of the latter group apparently was caused largely by lack of activation of sesone by autoclaving soil and large losses from the soil of CDEC, EPTC, and CDAA even before seeds were planted.

High toxicity of picloram and monuron was showed by reductions in seedling survival, total dry weight increment of plants, and dry weight increment of surviving seedlings. Various temperature regimes greatly affected growth of herbicide treated plants and controls. In control plants both high and low temperatures adversely affected seedling survival and dry weight more than shoot growth. Temperature extremes generally inhibited root growth more than shoot growth. The high temperatures, 25 and 30 °C, markedly enhanced phytotoxicity of picloram and muron.

The PDF includes a summary in Finnish.

  • Kozlowski, ORCID ID:E-mail:
  • Sasaki, ORCID ID:E-mail:
  • Torrie, ORCID ID:E-mail:
article id 4751, category Article
Ilmari Schalin. (1967). On the effect of nitrogen fertilization on the bacteria and microfungi in humus layer. Silva Fennica vol. 1 no. 3 article id 4751. https://doi.org/10.14214/sf.a14535

During the summer and fall of 1966 changes brought about by urea, calcium ammonium nitrate, nitrate of lime, and ammonium sulphate were observed. Application of the fertilizers corresponded to 100 kg/N per hectare.

The effect of urea was immediate. The pH rose and the bacterial density increased to 20–30 times more than determined in the spring, while the microfungal density decreased to one third of the spring density. In the ammonium sulphate plot opposite changes occurred almost as rapidly as in the previous case. A gradually increasing biological activity observed after application of calcium ammonium nitrate and of lime fertilizers seemed almost the same for bacteria and microfungi. Both microbe groups displayed consistent quantitative growth. pH 4.3 was the limit of acidity below which the bacteria showed a tendency to decline and the microfungi to increase, while the opposite was true above this limit.

The PDF includes a summary in Finnish.

  • Schalin, ORCID ID:E-mail:

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