Current issue: 53(2)

Under compilation: 53(3)

Impact factor 1.683
5-year impact factor 1.950
Silva Fennica 1926-1997
1990-1997
1980-1989
1970-1979
1960-1969
Acta Forestalia Fennica
1953-1968
1933-1952
1913-1932

Articles containing the keyword 'Betula nana'.

Category: Research article

article id 905, category Research article
Katarzyna A. Jadwiszczak, Danuta Drzymulska, Agata Banaszek, Piotr Jadwiszczak. (2012). Population history, genetic variation and conservation status of the endangered birch species Betula nana L. in Poland. Silva Fennica vol. 46 no. 4 article id 905. https://doi.org/10.14214/sf.905
The effective conservation of species requires data on the levels and distribution of genetic diversity within and among populations. In this study, we estimated the genetic variation in three isolated populations of Betula nana in Poland. An analysis of 11 nuclear microsatellites revealed moderate mean heterozygosities (HO=0.556, HE=0.562), low mean number of alleles per locus (A=4.57) and no inbreeding in the total sample. An M-ratio test indicated that each population had experienced a severe bottleneck in the past. Tests for heterozygosity excess revealed that a significant decrease in the numbers of individuals in two populations had occurred quite recently. The large number of private alleles and very restricted number of migrants between populations (Nm=0.35) strongly suggest that genetic drift and geographic isolation are the primary factors responsible for the reduction of genetic variation in the Polish populations of B. nana. We detected two cpDNA haplotypes in the study populations, which can be explained in terms of either the genetic drift acting on the relict localities or a postglacial recolonisation from distinct refugia. Palynological data indicated that one refugium could be located in the Carpathians and their northern foreland. The primary threat to B. nana in Poland is the overgrowth of its habitats by competing species, which has likely resulted in a lack of generative reproduction in the mountain populations.
  • Jadwiszczak, Institute of Biology, University of Białystok, wierkowa 20B, 15-950 Białystok, Poland ORCID ID:E-mail: kszalaj@uwb.edu.pl (email)
  • Drzymulska, Institute of Biology, University of Białystok, wierkowa 20B, 15-950 Białystok, Poland ORCID ID:E-mail:
  • Banaszek, Institute of Biology, University of Białystok, wierkowa 20B, 15-950 Białystok, Poland ORCID ID:E-mail:
  • Jadwiszczak, Institute of Biology, University of Białystok, wierkowa 20B, 15-950 Białystok, Poland ORCID ID:E-mail:
article id 169, category Research article
Susanne von Bargen, Elise Grubits, Risto Jalkanen, Carmen Büttner. (2009). Cherry leaf roll virus – an emerging virus in Finland? Silva Fennica vol. 43 no. 5 article id 169. https://doi.org/10.14214/sf.169
Cherry leaf roll virus, CLRV, is a plant pathogen that infects a variety of deciduous trees and shrubs in temperate regions. Little is known about its occurrence at high latitudes and especially in Finnish birch species. Still, symptoms that seemed to be associated with CLRV such as vein banding, leaf roll and decline have been observed in birch trees throughout the country since the summer of 2002. Six different birch species, subspecies or varieties, i.e. Betula pubescens subsp. pubescens (downy birch), B. pendula (silver birch), B. nana (dwarf birch), B. pubescens var. appressa (Kiilopää birch), B. pubescens subsp. czerepanovii (mountain birch) and B. pendula var. carelica (curly birch) originating from all over Finland were assessed by immunocapture-reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (IC-RT-PCR) for CLRV infection. It was shown that CLRV is widely distributed in B. pendula and B. pubescens throughout the country. Furthermore, dwarf birch, mountain birch, Kiilopää birch and curly birch were confirmed to be previously unkown hosts of CLRV. Genetic analysis of virus sequence variants originating from Finnish birch trees revealed atypical phylogenetic relationships. In contrast to CLRV isolates from birches growing in the United Kingdom and Germany which clustered exclusively within group A, Finnish CLRV isolates belonged either to group B, D or E. Thus, virus population structure in Finnish birches seems to be more variable and host plant dependency seems not to apply for Finnish CLRV isolates.
  • Bargen, Humboldt-Universität zu Berlin, Department für Nutzpflanzen- und Tierwissenschaften, Fachgebiet Phytomedizin, Lentzeallee 55/57, 14195 Berlin, Germany ORCID ID:E-mail: susanne.von.bargen@agrar.hu-berlin.de (email)
  • Grubits, Humboldt-Universität zu Berlin, Department für Nutzpflanzen- und Tierwissenschaften, Fachgebiet Phytomedizin, Lentzeallee 55/57, 14195 Berlin, Germany ORCID ID:E-mail:
  • Jalkanen, Finnish Forest Research Institute, Rovaniemi Research Unit, P.O. Box 16, FI-96301 Rovaniemi, Finland ORCID ID:E-mail: risto.jalkanen@metla.fi
  • Büttner, Humboldt-Universität zu Berlin, Department für Nutzpflanzen- und Tierwissenschaften, Fachgebiet Phytomedizin, Lentzeallee 55/57, 14195 Berlin, Germany ORCID ID:E-mail:

Category: Research note

article id 927, category Research note
Risto Jalkanen, Carmen Büttner, Susanne von Bargen. (2007). Cherry leaf roll virus abundant on Betula pubescens in Finland. Silva Fennica vol. 41 no. 4 article id 927. https://doi.org/10.14214/sf.927
Virus-related symptoms such as vein banding, leaf roll, chlorosis and subsequent necrosis on birch leaves were increasingly recorded throughout Finland since 2002. They are widespread in this country and have also been detected in northern Norway and Sweden. Symptomatic foliage has so far been found on Betula pendula, B. pubescens, B. pubescens subsp. czerepanovii, and B. nana. A Cherry leaf roll virus (CLRV) specific IC-RT-PCR was applied to young leaves, buds and catkins of symptomatic shoots of nineteen pubescent and one silver birch trees grown in the centre of Rovaniemi, Finland. CLRV was found in seventeen B. pubescens trees. This is the first time that B. pubescens has been confirmed to be a host species for CLRV in Finland. Nor has CLRV been recorded earlier in northern Finland.
  • Jalkanen, Finnish Forest Research Institute, Rovaniemi Research Unit, P.O. Box 16, FI-96301 Rovaniemi, Finland ORCID ID:E-mail: risto.jalkanen@metla.fi (email)
  • Büttner, Humboldt Universität zu Berlin, Institut für Gartenbauwissenschaften, Fachgebiet Phytomedizin, Lentzeallee 55/57, 14195 Berlin, Germany ORCID ID:E-mail: Carmen.Buettner@agrar.hu-berlin.de
  • Bargen, Humboldt Universität zu Berlin, Institut für Gartenbauwissenschaften, Fachgebiet Phytomedizin, Lentzeallee 55/57, 14195 Berlin, Germany ORCID ID:E-mail: susanne.von.bargen@agrar.hu-berlin.de

Category: Article

article id 5155, category Article
K. M. Bhat, Matti Kärkkäinen. (1982). Wood anatomy and physical properties of the wood and bark in Betula nana growing in Finland. Silva Fennica vol. 16 no. 1 article id 5155. https://doi.org/10.14214/sf.a15070

Eighty Betula nana samples were collected from three swamp sites. In the butt portion of the dwarf shrub the average number of growth rings was 12 and the average diameter of the sprouts 6 mm. The basic density of wood was 457 kg/m3 and that of bark 544 kg/m3. The proportion of bark was 32–38% of weight or volume. The vessel elements and fibres were short and their diameter small. The proportion of vessels was 15%, that of fibres 70% and that of rays 15%.

The PDF includes a summary in Finnish.

  • Bhat, ORCID ID:E-mail:
  • Kärkkäinen, ORCID ID:E-mail:

Register
Click this link to register for Silva Fennica submission and tracking system.
Log in
If you are a registered user, log in to save your selected articles for later access.
Contents alert
Sign up to receive alerts of new content
Your selected articles

Committee on Publication Ethics A Trusted Community-Governed Archive