Current issue: 53(4)

Under compilation: 54(1)

Impact factor 1.683
5-year impact factor 1.950
Silva Fennica 1926-1997
1990-1997
1980-1989
1970-1979
1960-1969
Acta Forestalia Fennica
1953-1968
1933-1952
1913-1932

Articles containing the keyword 'Karelia'.

Category: Article

article id 7275, category Article
Esa Hyyppä. (1933). Das Klima und die Wälder der spätglazialen Zeit im Bereich der karelischen Landenge. Acta Forestalia Fennica vol. 39 no. 4 article id 7275. https://doi.org/10.14214/aff.7275
English title: The climate and forests in the late glacial time in the region of the Karelian Isthmus.

The study is based on pollen analyses of varves collected from Kivennapa area. The varves contain the plant fossils of Dryas sp., which were the typical plants of the era. Geological samples form the Russia side of the border are also utilized. The study describes the results regarding the late-glacial forests and the vegetation that consist mostly of Dryas sp. and the climate in the area in the late-glacial era.

The late-glacial era in the Karelian Isthmus should be divided into two periods and better named as glacial and subglacial eras, also known as arctic and subarctic eras. 

The PDF contains a summary in Finnish.

  • Hyyppä, ORCID ID:E-mail:
article id 7103, category Article
J. P. Norrlin. (1923). Flora Kareliae onegensis. I. Über die Vegetation von Onega-Karelien und die naturgeschichtliche Grenze Finnlands sowie Skandinaviens im Osten. Acta Forestalia Fennica vol. 23 no. 4 article id 7103. https://doi.org/10.14214/aff.7103
English title: Flora in area of Ääninen (Onega)-lake in Russian Karelia – Vegetation of Onega Karelia area and the natural historical border of Scandinavia and Finland in East.

The article begins on the page 27/122 of the PDF file.

The first part of the text deals with a general presentation of the geographical, biological and cultural conditions of the studied areas. The second part presents the characteristics of vegetation classified according the forest types, with lists of species. Forested areas, open lands and swampy areas are dealt with separately. The Saoneshje peninsula is presented separately.

The third part of the text discusses the similarities of the natural conditions between studied area and respective part of Finland. The vegetation and amount of species is clearly more diverse in studied area than in parts of middle-Finland. The study shows that in respect to vegetation Onega-Karelia cannot be seen as a part of the same region than Finland.  

  • Norrlin, ORCID ID:E-mail:
article id 5221, category Article
Aleksandr P. Jevdokimov. (1984). Visakoivun kasvatus Neuvostoliiton luoteisosissa. Silva Fennica vol. 18 no. 3 article id 5221. https://doi.org/10.14214/sf.a15400
English title: Experiences of curly birch growing in north-western Russia.

Curly birch (Betula pendula var. carelica (Merklin) Hejtmanek) is widely distributed over north-western part or Russia, including the Baltic Soviet Republics and Belorussia. Experiences of growing this decorative species in Soviet Karelia and Leningrad region are presented. Commonly used classifications of the species are described, and recommendations for management of curly birch cultures and production of planting stock in greenhouses are given.

The PDF includes a summary in English.

  • Jevdokimov, ORCID ID:E-mail:
article id 7030, category Article
Eino Saari. (1919). Itä-Suomen lahjoitusmailla noudatetusta metsäpolitiikasta. Acta Forestalia Fennica vol. 12 no. 3 article id 7030. https://doi.org/10.14214/aff.7030
English title: Forest policy associated to donated lands in Eastern Finland.

The article is a review on the lands that were donated to the Russian aristocracy in Eastern and Southeastern Finland in 1700s. The farmers in the area used to be tenants of state lands or independent land owners. The insufficient and diverse stipulation of the ownership of the lands in the donation documents caused later disputes between the landlords and the farmers. One of the issues was who had right to use the forests. For the farmers this meant significant reductions in their right to harvest timber and household wood, or practice shifting cultivation. There were attempts to improve the situation of the tenants, but the final solution came in the end of 1800s, when the parliament began to promote farmers’ right to purchase the lands. In the land reform, the state raised a loan to purchase the donated lands, and give them to the farmers, who would then pay back their share of the loan. Part of the forests remained state lands in the reform. Several jointly owned forests were also established using the state forests to give access to household wood for farms that had little own forests. The private forests on donated lands had larger standing crop than the private forests in general. Together with increasing demand of wood for the developing manufacturing industry, this gave possibility for abusive practices in timber trade. The timber prices were low, and farmers exchanged felling rights to loan.

  • Saari, ORCID ID:E-mail:
article id 4580, category Article
Johannes Virolainen. (1943). Karjalan kannaksen metsätaloudesta ja sen merkityksestä alueen pienviljelijöiden ansiotaloudessa. Silva Fennica no. 60 article id 4580. https://doi.org/10.14214/sf.a9084
English title: Forestry in the Karelian isthmus and its influence on the economy of small farms.

The article is based on studies made in the Karelian isthmus in 1936-1938 before the World War II broke in 1939. Further studies were not possible after the war when the area was handed over to Soviet Union. Economic data of agriculture and forestry of the farms had mostly been regarded separately in the early economic studies of small farms in Finland. This survey aimed at studying influence of forestry in the economy of a small farm. 141 farms were included in a more detailed survey.

Forestry accounted for in average 38% of total income of the farms in 1937-1938. The farms had sold wood often, the amounts being often small. Good transport connections in the area facilitated the sales. Over 70% were sales at delivered price, and about half of the wood was small-sized timber. According to the results of the survey, forestry was important for the small farms in Karelian isthmus. The farmers could not have made a living without the forests. Hoveter, the farms had had to overuse the forest resources. The wood resources decreased by 18-22% in 1922-1938. They were, however, at the same level as in average in Finland in 1938.

The article includes an abstract in German.

  • Virolainen, ORCID ID:E-mail:

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