Current issue: 53(3)

Under compilation: 53(4)

Impact factor 1.683
5-year impact factor 1.950
Silva Fennica 1926-1997
1990-1997
1980-1989
1970-1979
1960-1969
Acta Forestalia Fennica
1953-1968
1933-1952
1913-1932

Articles containing the keyword 'Populus × wettsteinii'.

Category: Research article

article id 1135, category Research article
Matts Lindbladh, Per-Ola Hedwall, Ida Wallin, Annika M. Felton, Henrik Böhlenius, Adam Felton. (2014). Short-rotation bioenergy stands as an alternative to spruce plantations: implications for bird biodiversity. Silva Fennica vol. 48 no. 5 article id 1135. https://doi.org/10.14214/sf.1135
Highlights: There is a gap in knowledge regarding the biodiversity implications of replacing production forests with bioenergy stands; We compared the avian biodiversity of early rotation hybrid aspen stands and spruce plantations, the latter being the dominant production forest type in southern Sweden; Our results indicate that young hybrid aspen stands can support relatively diverse and distinctive bird communities.
Global efforts to decrease dependence on fossil fuels have increased interest in bioenergy production. One source of bioenergy is fast growing deciduous tree species, such as hybrid aspen (Populus × wettsteinii Hämet-Ahti). The majority of research on hybrid aspen which assesses biodiversity implications, has however primarily focused on agricultural lands as the reference condition. This has resulted in a substantial gap in our knowledge regarding the biodiversity implications of replacing production forest types with hybrid aspen, a form of reforestation taking place in northern Europe. In this study we address this knowledge gap by comparing the avian biodiversity of young hybrid aspen and spruce (Picea abies L.) plantations of similar age, the latter being the most prevalent forestry alternative in in southern Sweden. We found that hybrid aspen stands had higher bird species richness and abundance as well as a distinct community composition compared to the spruce stands. We suggest that the most likely driver was the greater structural and tree species complexity in the aspen stands, provided for by the fenced exclusion of ungulates from the regenerating hybrid aspen stands. Our results indicate that at least during early stages of regeneration, and in comparison to the dominating production forest type in the region, hybrid aspen stands can support relatively high levels of bird diversity, and a bird species composition more closely associated with broadleaf habitat types requiring restoration in this region.
  • Lindbladh, Southern Swedish Forest Research Centre, SLU – Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, P.O. Box 49, SE-230 53 Alnarp, Sweden ORCID ID:E-mail: matts.lindbladh@slu.se (email)
  • Hedwall, Southern Swedish Forest Research Centre, SLU – Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, P.O. Box 49, SE-230 53 Alnarp, Sweden ORCID ID:E-mail: per-ola.hedwall@slu.se
  • Wallin, Southern Swedish Forest Research Centre, SLU – Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, P.O. Box 49, SE-230 53 Alnarp, Sweden ORCID ID:E-mail: ida.wallin@slu.se
  • Felton, Southern Swedish Forest Research Centre, SLU – Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, P.O. Box 49, SE-230 53 Alnarp, Sweden ORCID ID:E-mail: annika.felton@slu.se
  • Böhlenius, Southern Swedish Forest Research Centre, SLU – Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, P.O. Box 49, SE-230 53 Alnarp, Sweden ORCID ID:E-mail: henrik.bohlenius@slu.se
  • Felton, Southern Swedish Forest Research Centre, SLU – Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, P.O. Box 49, SE-230 53 Alnarp, Sweden ORCID ID:E-mail: adam.felton@slu.se

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