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Articles containing the keyword 'coppicing'.

Category: Research article

article id 1588, category Research article
Kouakou Laurent Kouakou, Jonas Patrick Dao, Kouadio Ignace Kouassi, Manehonon Martine Beugré , Mongomaké Koné, Jean-Pierre Baudoin, Irié Arsene Zoro Bi. (2016). Propagation of Garcinia kola (Heckel) by stem and root cuttings. Silva Fennica vol. 50 no. 4 article id 1588. https://doi.org/10.14214/sf.1588
Highlights: Roots and branches cuttings from mature forest trees are difficult to sprout; The highest mean numbers of roots and buds produced were obtained with softwood cuttings; The aqueous IBA treatment was more effective than the powder in promoting rooting and root development; Non-mist poly-propagator gave the best propagation results; Seedling stockplants cut above node 1 promoted most vigorous shoots production.

The availability of appropriate propagation techniques is a major constraint to the domestication of the forest trees widely used by rural communities; such as Garcinia kola (Heckel). This study tested the ability of root and stem cuttings to regenerate vegetatively when treated with indole-3-butyric acid (IBA), and set in non-mist poly-propagator within a shaded nursery. It found that G. kola is amenable to propagation by softwood stem cuttings. Attention was given to the effect of cutting age (softwood, semi hardwood) and IBA application with regard to the sprouting and rooting efficiency. Bud and leaf emergence time were also investigated, as was the coppicing ability of the stump. Results revealed that roots and branches from mature forest trees did not sprout under any culture conditions. The highest percentages of rooting (70–85%) were obtained with softwood cuttings set in non-mist poly-propagator, regardless of hormonal treatment. The mean numbers of buds (2.9 ± 0.4) and roots (2.6 ± 0.1) produced by softwood cuttings was significantly greater than those obtained in the Control. The best average emergence time of buds (25.1 days ± 9.3) and leaves (36.8days ± 8.4) was obtained with cuttings treated with IBA and set in non-mist poly-propagator against, 54.4 ± 12.5 and 72.6 ± 3.4 days respectively for the Control. In general, non-mist poly-propagator gave the best propagation results. When coppiced, the shoots emerging from stumps with one node were the most vigorous.

  • Kouakou, Université Nangui Abrogoua, UFR/SN, Laboratoire de Génomique Fonctionnelle et Amélioration génétique, 02 BP 801 Abidjan, Côte d’Ivoire; Université Nangui Abrogoua, UFR Sciences de la Nature, Laboratoire de Biologie et Amélioration des Productions Végétales, 02 BP 801 Abidjan 02, Côte d’Ivoire ORCID ID:E-mail: kk_laurent@yahoo.fr (email)
  • Dao, Université Nangui Abrogoua, UFR/SN, Laboratoire de Génomique Fonctionnelle et Amélioration génétique, 02 BP 801 Abidjan, Côte d’Ivoire ORCID ID:E-mail: daojonas@hotmail.fr
  • Kouassi, Université Nangui Abrogoua, UFR/SN, Laboratoire de Génomique Fonctionnelle et Amélioration génétique, 02 BP 801 Abidjan, Côte d’Ivoire ORCID ID:E-mail: kouadioignace@yahoo.fr
  • Beugré , Université Nangui Abrogoua, UFR Sciences de la Nature, Laboratoire de Biologie et Amélioration des Productions Végétales, 02 BP 801 Abidjan 02, Côte d’Ivoire ORCID ID:E-mail: beugremartine@yahoo.fr
  • Koné,  Université Nangui Abrogoua, UFR Sciences de la Nature, Laboratoire de Biologie et Amélioration des Productions Végétales, 02 BP 801 Abidjan 02, Côte d’Ivoire ORCID ID:E-mail: babadaoudi@gmail.com
  • Baudoin, Université de Liège, Gembloux Agro-Bio Tech, Laboratoire Agroécologie tropicale et Horticulture, Passage des Déportés, 2 B 5030 Gembloux, Belgique ORCID ID:E-mail: jean-pierre.baudoin@ulg.ac.be
  • Zoro Bi, Université Nangui Abrogoua, UFR/SN, Laboratoire de Génomique Fonctionnelle et Amélioration génétique, 02 BP 801 Abidjan, Côte d’Ivoire ORCID ID:E-mail: banhiakalou@yahoo.fr
article id 1260, category Research article
Jyrki Hytönen, Anna Saarsalmi. (2015). Biomass production of coppiced grey alder and the effect of fertilization. Silva Fennica vol. 49 no. 1 article id 1260. https://doi.org/10.14214/sf.1260
Highlights: Fertilisation (wood ash, N, PK) did not affect grey alder biomass production; Leafless above-ground biomass of 17–20 year old stands was 52–57 Mg ha–1; MAI increased with increase of rotation length to the end of the follow-up period of 17–20 years; Coppicing increased stand density manifold.
We studied biomass production of two naturally originated grey alder (Alnus incana (L.) Moench) stands having a mixture of birch and willow located in central Finland. One of the stands was growing on a peatland site (Muhos) and the other on a mineral soil site (Juuka). The stands were clear-cut and fertilization experiments were laid out with several treatments. At Muhos, the treatments included nitrogen fertilisation with different amounts of wood ash and an unfertilized control. At Juuka, the treatments included nitrogen fertilisation either with ash or with PK, and ash and PK treatments alone and an unfertilized control. The sprouts at Muhos were grown for 17 years and at Juuka for 20 years. At Juuka the stand was clear-cut second time at the age of 20 years and grown for 8 years. The stands were measured several times and foliar samples were taken twice during the study period. Clear-cutting increased stem number manifold. The stand density of new coppiced forests after the clear-cutting decreased from 67 000–89 000 stems ha–1 at the age of 3–6 years to 10 000–12 000 stems ha–1 at the age of 17–20 years. On neither site fertilization affected biomass production of alders during the study period. Leafless above-ground biomass was 52–57 Mg ha–1 after 17–20 years. Mean annual leafless above-ground biomass production (MAI) increased with increase of rotation time. At the age of 17–20 years the MAI was 2.8–3.0 Mg ha a–1. At Muhos, ash increased foliar P and Ca concentrations, but decreased those of Mn.
  • Hytönen, Natural Resources Institute Finland, Silmäjärventie 2, FI-69100 Kannus, Finland ORCID ID:E-mail: jyrki.hytonen@luke.fi (email)
  • Saarsalmi, Natural Resources Institute Finland, P.O. Box 18, FI-01301 Vantaa, Finland ORCID ID:E-mail: anna.saarsalmi@luke.fi
article id 48, category Research article
Jyrki Hytönen, Lasse Aro. (2012). Biomass and nutrition of naturally regenerated and coppiced birch on cutaway peatland during 37 years. Silva Fennica vol. 46 no. 3 article id 48. https://doi.org/10.14214/sf.48
Biomass production and nutrient use of birch thickets with a mixture of willow on a cut away peatland in southern Finland over a period of 37 years was studied. Dense, naturally regenerated 16-year-old birch stands were cut down, fertilized with either wood ash (P 108 and K 339 kg ha–1) or PK fertilizer (P 50 and K 95 kg ha–1) or left unfertilized. The biomass production of the coppiced stands and one uncut stand was monitored for a period of 21 years. Soil nutrient and foliar nutrient concentrations were analyzed several times during the study period. Ash fertilization supplied more nutrients than PK fertilization and increased the soil nutrient amounts more. The foliar phosphorus concentration of birch on control plots indicated a severe phosphorus deficiency which was removed by PK and ash fertilization. Fertilization did not increase nutrient concentrations of the stem (wood + bark) nor the amount of nutrients bound in the biomass. Two energy wood rotations (16+21 years) produced 124–158 Mg ha–1 of leafless, above-ground biomass altogether corresponding to 61–78 Mg ha–1 of carbon. The highest biomass yield was achieved with a rotation of 37 years in the uncut stand (211 Mg ha–1). Corresponding values for mean annual increment (MAI) were 3.4–4.3 Mg ha–1 and 5.7 Mg ha–1. This study shows that the length of the rotation for birch in energy wood production should be longer than 21 years. PK and ash fertilization increased the biomass of coppiced 21-year-old birch by 23 Mg ha–1 and 33 Mg ha–1, respectively.
  • Hytönen, Finnish Forest Research Institute, Kannus, Finland ORCID ID:E-mail: jyrki.hytonen@metla.fi (email)
  • Aro, Finnish Forest Research Institute, Kannus, Finland ORCID ID:E-mail: lasse.aro@metla.fi

Category: Article

article id 7356, category Article
Peitsa Mikola. (1942). Koivun vesomisesta ja sen metsänhoidollisesta merkityksestä. Acta Forestalia Fennica vol. 50 no. 3 article id 7356. https://doi.org/10.14214/aff.7356
English title: Silvicultural usefulness of sprouting of birch.

Birches’ (Betula sp.) ability to grow sprouts is low. The stump grows root collar and stump shoots, but the stump shoots are not proper stump shoots that will grow from the space between wood and bark. The buds are situated very low in the base, even under the ground. In this study, no actual root shoots could be found. Also the bushy alpine birches seem to be formed from stump and root collar shoots.

In Southern Finland silver birch (Betula pendula Roth) is more common than downy birch (Betula pubescens Ehrh.) in dry upland forest sites, while downy birch is common in fresh mineral soil forests and peatlands. In Northern Finland downy birch is the dominant birch species. Of the two species downy birch has markedly better capacity to form stump and root collar shoots both in Northern and Southern Finland. In general, birches grow sprouts much more strongly in Northern Finland.

Growth of the shoots is fastest during the first year after the felling of the parent tree and slows down gradually. The stump shoots may get separated from the stump when the stump decays, and the decay may also spread to the shoots. It is common that the shoots have no own roots, and die along with the stump. The shoots may have own root system or use roots of the parent tree that have stayed alive, in the latter case decay spreads almost always from the stump to the shoot. Whether the tree was felled with axe or saw had no effect on sprouting, probably because the sprouting buds are situated in the base of the tree. The larger stumps had usually fewer sprouts than smaller stumps. The fertility of the site seemed to have little effect on sprouting, but more moist sites formed more sprouts.

Forest regeneration using sprouts may be possible in peatlands for firewood production. on mineral soil sites birch does not suit for coppicing. The proportion of trees originating from sprouts decreases strongly by the time. Consequently, in Southern Finland sprouts have little effect on regeneration of birch. In Northern Finland sprouting is the most important way of regeneration.

The PDF includes a summary in German.

  • Mikola, ORCID ID:E-mail:

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