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Articles containing the keyword 'field trials'.

Category: Research article

article id 10276, category Research article
Adas Marčiulynas, Vaida Sirgedaitė-Šėžienė, Povilas Žemaitis, Āris Jansons, Virgilijus Baliuckas. (2020). Resistance of Scots pine half-sib families to Heterobasidion annosum in progeny field trials. Silva Fennica vol. 54 no. 4 article id 10276. https://doi.org/10.14214/sf.10276
Highlights: Large genetic variation was estimated in the resistance of Scots pine half-sib families to root rot in field trials; A strong relationship was observed between family resistance to root rot and phenolic compound concentration in the wood.

Five Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris L.) progeny field trials, each established in different Lithuanian regions of provenance in 1983, were studied. Each progeny field trial consists of 140 half-sib families from seven populations (20 families from each population). The evaluation was carried out in 2012 and 2018 to assess the families resistance to Heterobasidion annosum (Fr.) Bref. An index of resistance in the infected plots was calculated. To verify the accuracy of the method, total phenolic compounds (TPC) was chosen as key parameter to compare with the plant resistance index. During the six years between the two assessments, the percentage of living Scots pine trees in the progeny field trials decreased up to 20 percentage points (range: 4 p.p. to 20 p.p.). In 2018 the area of H. annosum damaged plots (in percentage from total field trial area) varied from 17 to 27%. Tree mortality in the trial correlates with site soil fertility – more fertile soils were distinguished by higher tree percentage loss and vice versa. Using analysis from combined data of all progeny trials, the family variance component reached 13.3 ± 2.2% and family heritability was 0.81. Family heritability estimates for root rot resistance show possibilities of high breeding effectiveness. The correlations between the trials in family resistance estimates were negligible (ranging from 0 to 0.28). The significant high correlation coefficient was determined between the resistance index and TPC concentration (r = 0.77, p = 0.0003). This allows us to assume that plant resistance is directly linked on TPC synthesis. The results indicate that the chosen methods of chemical resistance for identification of root rot-resistant genotypes are applicable for the selection of Scots pine half-sib families in the field trials with higher resistance to pathogens.

  • Marčiulynas, Institute of Forestry, Lithuanian Research Centre for Agriculture and Forestry, Liepų str. 1, LT-53101 Girionys, Kaunas District, Lithuania ORCID ID:E-mail: adas.marciulynas@mi.lt (email)
  • Sirgedaitė-Šėžienė, Institute of Forestry, Lithuanian Research Centre for Agriculture and Forestry, Liepų str. 1, LT-53101 Girionys, Kaunas District, Lithuania ORCID ID:E-mail: vaida.seziene@mi.lt
  • Žemaitis, Institute of Forestry, Lithuanian Research Centre for Agriculture and Forestry, Liepų str. 1, LT-53101 Girionys, Kaunas District, Lithuania ORCID ID:E-mail: povilas.zemaitis@mi.lt
  • Jansons, Latvian State Forest Research Institute “Silava”, Department of Forest Tree Breeding, Rigas St.t. 111, Salaspils LV-2169, Latvia ORCID ID:E-mail: aris.jansons@silava.lv
  • Baliuckas, Institute of Forestry, Lithuanian Research Centre for Agriculture and Forestry, Liepų str. 1, LT-53101 Girionys, Kaunas District, Lithuania ORCID ID:E-mail: virgilijus.baliuckas@mi.lt
article id 93, category Research article
Pertti Pulkkinen, Saila Varis, Raimo Jaatinen, Aulis Leppänen, Anne Pakkanen. (2011). Increasing survival and growth of Scots pine seedlings with selection based on autumn coloration. Silva Fennica vol. 45 no. 4 article id 93. https://doi.org/10.14214/sf.93
This study evaluates the possibility of using autumn coloration of young Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris L.) seedlings as an indicator of adaptation to harsh climate conditions. One-year old seedlings from natural stands with different origins and seed orchards were classified as “red/reddish” and “green” based on the needle color after artificially increased night length in nursery and then measured after 14 years in field trials. In almost all the studied groups seedlings classified as “red/reddish” had significantly higher survival rate than seedlings classified as “green”. The survival of “red/reddish” was 14.2% higher than “green” among natural stand seed material and 56.2% among seed orchard material. During the study period the survival difference between “red/reddish” and “green” seedlings tended to increase. The seedling color had limited connection with the height growth, even though the trees classified as “red/reddish” were slightly taller than those classified as “green”. However, the total productivity over all field trials, described here as a heightsum, of “red/reddish” trees was 15% higher than productivity of “green” trees from natural stand material, and 61% higher than those from seed orchard material. It seems that controlled selection based on autumn color can be utilized within seed crops of different types with the aim to increase the adaptability of seed material to different environmental conditions.
  • Pulkkinen, Metla, Haapastensyrjä, Läyliäinen, Finland ORCID ID:E-mail: pertti.pulkkinen@metla.fi (email)
  • Varis, Metla, Haapastensyrjä, Läyliäinen, Finland ORCID ID:E-mail:
  • Jaatinen, Metla, Haapastensyrjä, Läyliäinen, Finland ORCID ID:E-mail:
  • Leppänen, Metla, Haapastensyrjä, Läyliäinen, Finland ORCID ID:E-mail:
  • Pakkanen, Metla, Haapastensyrjä, Läyliäinen, Finland ORCID ID:E-mail:

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