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Articles containing the keyword 'genetic structure'.

Category: Research article

article id 9987, category Research article
Monika Dering, Katarzyna Sękiewicz, Grzegorz Iszkuło, Aleksandra Chojnacka, Dominik Tomaszewski, Emilia Pers-Kamczyc, Piotr Karolewski. (2018). Spatial genetic structure and clonal structure of Prunus serotina during invasive spread. Silva Fennica vol. 52 no. 3 article id 9987. https://doi.org/10.14214/sf.9987
Highlights: The spread of Prunus serotina in invaded forests is facilitated by high propagule pressure; The seed shadow overlap prevents strong spatial genetic structure; During colonization of isolated site, a strong spatial genetic structure is produced due to founder effect; Overall clonality in P. serotina was low but may efficiently support seedling bank thus contributing to species invasiveness.

Prunus serotina Ehrh. (black cherry) is one of the most important invaders in the European forests, but existing studies have given limited insight into demo-genetic factors underpinning the process of species invasion. Fine-scale genetic structure (FSGS) may deliver important knowledge on genetics of invasion contributing to efficient management of the alien species. Using eight microsatellites we investigated FSGS, clonal structure and relatedness in four black cherry populations which represented different stages of the invasive spread into Scots pine forests. Three populations were in a continuous forest complex and represented the colonization (Z_1) and established stages (Z_2 and Z_3). To investigate how colonization ability of the species is modified by landscape features, we analyzed an isolated population at colonization stage located in limited forest patch located in an agricultural landscape (R). Populations from continuous forest showed low yet significant positive FSGS with Sp = 0.0068 in Z_1, 0.0054 in Z_2, and 0.0066 in Z_3, while in R spatial structure was the strongest (0.0145). Considerable relatedness noted in population R suggests a dominance of within-population mating and recruitments, low immigration rate and limited seed dispersal, all of which led to the observed strong FSGS. Also, we presume that a founder effect likely involved during colonization of isolated forest patch R led to strong FSGS. In contrary, the seed shadow overlap in the populations from continuous forest prevented strong FSGS and facilitated colonization. Despite of low level of clonality, we argue that it may efficiently support black cherry seedling bank contributing to species invasiveness.

  • Dering, Institute of Dendrology, Polish Academy of Sciences, Parkowa 5, 62-035 Kórnik, Poland ORCID ID:E-mail: mdering@man.poznan.pl (email)
  • Sękiewicz, Institute of Dendrology, Polish Academy of Sciences, Parkowa 5, 62-035 Kórnik, Poland ORCID ID:E-mail: ksekiewicz@man.poznan.pl
  • Iszkuło, Institute of Dendrology, Polish Academy of Sciences, Parkowa 5, 62-035 Kórnik, Poland; Faculty of Biological Sciences, University of Zielona Góra, Prof. Z. Szafrana 1, 65-516 Zielona Góra, Poland ORCID ID:E-mail: iszkulo@man.poznan.pl
  • Chojnacka, Institute of Dendrology, Polish Academy of Sciences, Parkowa 5, 62-035 Kórnik, Poland ORCID ID:E-mail: jagoda900@gmail.com
  • Tomaszewski, Institute of Dendrology, Polish Academy of Sciences, Parkowa 5, 62-035 Kórnik, Poland ORCID ID:E-mail: dominito@man.poznan.pl
  • Pers-Kamczyc, Institute of Dendrology, Polish Academy of Sciences, Parkowa 5, 62-035 Kórnik, Poland ORCID ID:E-mail: epk@man.poznan.pl
  • Karolewski, Institute of Dendrology, Polish Academy of Sciences, Parkowa 5, 62-035 Kórnik, Poland ORCID ID:E-mail: pkarolew@man.poznan.pl
article id 1743, category Research article
Gintare Sabalinkiene, Darius Danusevicius, Michael Manton, Gediminas Brazaitis, Kastytis Simkevicius. (2017). Differentiation of European roe deer populations and ecotypes in Lithuania based on DNA markers, cranium and antler morphometry. Silva Fennica vol. 51 no. 3 article id 1743. https://doi.org/10.14214/sf.1743
Highlights: Lithuanian roe deer populations are genetically structured into southern and northern groups, most likely affected by a divergent gene flow and Lithuania’s largest rivers slowing down migration; Microsatellite and skull morphology based genetic differentiation between field and forest ecotypes are weak; Geographical location has a significant effect on antler morphometry traits and skull size of male roe deer, the latter increasing northwards.

The objective of our study was to assess the genetic and morphological differentiation of European roe deer (Capreolus capreolus L.) in Lithuania based on DNA markers, skull and anther morphology. DNA was extracted from 79 culled individuals at 13 locations and genotyped at five nuclear microsatellite loci. Based on culling location, individuals were assigned to either a field (N = 43) or a forest ecotype (N = 36). Skull and antler morphometry was studied on 603 and 292 individuals, respectively. Results showed no significant genetic and skull morphology differentiation between the ecotypes. The forest ecotype tends to exhibit lower genetic diversity compared to the field ecotype, particularly for male individuals. The genetic differentiation of roe deer in Lithuania was significant based on the RST values, but not on the FST values. A STRUCTURE analyses revealed southern and northern genetic clusters, most likely affected by divergent gene flow. The country’s major rivers Nemunas and Neris are likely to increase differentiation between the clusters. ANOVA on skull morphology by gender and age indicated a significant effect of geographical location. Skull size (especially length) is greater in the northern part of the country. We also found significant effects of age, ecotype and geographical location on most of the roe deer male antler morphometric traits.

  • Sabalinkiene, Institute of Forest Biology and Silviculture, Faculty of Forest Sciences and Ecology, Aleksandras Stulginskis University, Studentu street 11, Akademija, Kaunas district, Lithuania ORCID ID:E-mail: gintare.sabalinkiene@asu.lt (email)
  • Danusevicius, Institute of Forest Biology and Silviculture, Faculty of Forest Sciences and Ecology, Aleksandras Stulginskis University, Studentu street 11, Akademija, Kaunas district, Lithuania ORCID ID:E-mail: darius.danusevicius@asu.lt
  • Manton, Institute of Forest Biology and Silviculture, Faculty of Forest Sciences and Ecology, Aleksandras Stulginskis University, Studentu street 11, Akademija, Kaunas district, Lithuania ORCID ID:E-mail: michael.manton@asu.lt
  • Brazaitis, Institute of Forest Biology and Silviculture, Faculty of Forest Sciences and Ecology, Aleksandras Stulginskis University, Studentu street 11, Akademija, Kaunas district, Lithuania ORCID ID:E-mail: gediminas.brazaitis@asu.lt
  • Simkevicius, Institute of Forest Biology and Silviculture, Faculty of Forest Sciences and Ecology, Aleksandras Stulginskis University, Studentu street 11, Akademija, Kaunas district, Lithuania ORCID ID:E-mail: kastytis.simkevicius@asu.lt
article id 1283, category Research article
Ivana Bjedov, Dragica Obratov–Petković, Danijela Mišić, Branislav Šiler, Jelena M Aleksic. (2015). Genetic patterns in range-edge populations of Vaccinium species from the central Balkans: implications on conservation prospects and sustainable usage. Silva Fennica vol. 49 no. 4 article id 1283. https://doi.org/10.14214/sf.1283
Highlights: We studied fragmentary distributed range-edge populations of Vaccinium myrtillus, Vaccinium uliginosum and Vaccinium vitis-idaea from the Balkans using RAPDs; Low genetic diversities and high genetic differentiation were found in all species; The prevalence of clonal individuals was not observed; Past interspecific hybridization among V. vitis-idaea and the other two species was detected; Guidelines for conservation and sustainable usage were provided.

Vaccinium myrtillus L., Vaccinium uliginosum L. and Vaccinium vitis-idaea L. are perennial, cold-adapted clonal shrubs distributed throughout Europe, northern Asia and North America. Due to their usage in food (berries) and pharmaceutical industry (berries and leaves), their natural populations are exposed to anthropogenic and other impacts that affect their genetic make-up. We analyzed 14 fragmentary distributed and small-sized peripheral populations of these species from the Balkans, which represents the southeastern-European marginal area of their wide European distributions, using RAPD molecular markers. The contemporary genetic patterns in all three species within the Balkans were generally similar, and in comparison to previous reports on populations of these species found in northward Europe, where they have a more continuous distribution, the levels of genetic diversity were more or less halved, genetic differentiation was several times higher, gene flow exceptionally low, and the expected prevalence of clonal individuals was lacking. The population dynamics of all three species within the Balkans was complex and distinct, and was characterized by a past admixture of individuals from discrete populations of the same species and interspecific hybridisation not only between V. myrtillus and V. vitis-idaea but also between V. uliginosum and V. vitis-idaea, the latter not being reported to date. Conservation measures suitable for preservation of presumably genetically distinct portions of the Balkans’ gene pools of studied species have been suggested, while the utility of interspecific hybrids in breeding programs and/ or in food/pharmaceutical industry is yet to be assessed. 

  • Bjedov, University of Belgrade, Faculty of Forestry, Kneza Višeslava 1, 11000 Belgrade, Serbia ORCID ID:E-mail: ivana.bjedov@sfb.bg.ac.rs
  • Obratov–Petković, University of Belgrade, Faculty of Forestry, Kneza Višeslava 1, 11000 Belgrade, Serbia ORCID ID:E-mail: dragica.obratov-petkovic@sfb.bg.ac.rs
  • Mišić, University of Belgrade, Institute for Biological Research “Siniša Stanković”, Boulevard Despota Stefana 142, 11000 Belgrade, Serbia ORCID ID:E-mail: dmisic@ibiss.bg.ac.rs
  • Šiler, University of Belgrade, Institute for Biological Research “Siniša Stanković”, Boulevard Despota Stefana 142, 11000 Belgrade, Serbia ORCID ID:E-mail: branislav.siler@ibiss.bg.ac.rs
  • Aleksic, University of Belgrade, Institute of Molecular Genetics and Genetic Engineering, Vojvode Stepe 444a, P.O. Box 23, 11010 Belgrade, Serbia ORCID ID:E-mail: aleksic_jelena@yahoo.com.au (email)
article id 291, category Research article
Yildiray Lise, Zeki Kaya, Fikret Isik, Rumi Sabuncu, Irfan Kandemir, Sertaç Önde. (2007). The impact of over-exploitation on the genetic structure of Turkish red pine (Pinus brutia Ten.) populations determined by RAPD markers. Silva Fennica vol. 41 no. 2 article id 291. https://doi.org/10.14214/sf.291
To determine the possible impact of over-exploitation on the genetic structure of Turkish red pine (Pinus brutia Ten.) populations, three natural and three over-exploited (human degraded) populations of the species in the Mediterranean region of Turkey were investigated with Randomly Amplified Polymorphic DNA (RAPD). With the 80 RAPD primers tested, 12 of them yielded 137 polymorphic RAPD fragments. Four of the studied populations maintained unique fragments. The mean proportion of polymorphic fragments for all populations ranged from 89.8 to 98.9% and there were no significant differences between natural (94.8%) vs. over-exploited populations (92.7%). The estimated heterozygosity values suggested that Turkish red pine maintains high levels of genetic diversity (range 0.24–0.28) though studied populations and grouped ones as natural (He = 0.28) vs. over-exploited (0.27) did not differ significantly. The mean FST value indicated that the large portion of the total genetic diversity was within populations (93%), but this value was lower in the natural populations (92%) than in the over-exploited ones (94%). In over-exploited populations, excess of homozygosity was observed (about 6% higher) as compared to natural populations, indicating impacts of inbreeding in P. brutia.
  • Lise, Department of Biological Sciences, Middle East Technical University, 06531, Ankara, Turkey ORCID ID:E-mail:
  • Kaya, Department of Biological Sciences, Middle East Technical University, 06531, Ankara, Turkey ORCID ID:E-mail: kayaz@metu.edu.tr (email)
  • Isik, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, USA ORCID ID:E-mail:
  • Sabuncu, Southwest Anatolia Forest Research Institute, Antalya, Turkey ORCID ID:E-mail:
  • Kandemir, Department of Biology, Zonguldak Karaelmas University, 67100, Zonguldak, Turkey ORCID ID:E-mail:
  • Önde, Department of Biological Sciences, Middle East Technical University, 06531, Ankara, Turkey ORCID ID:E-mail:

Category: Research note

article id 5644, category Research note
Jiří Korecký, Jan Bílý, Petr Sedlák, Milan Lstibůrek. (2017). Innovative multiplex and its evaluation for effective genotyping of wild cherry. Silva Fennica vol. 51 no. 3 article id 5644. https://doi.org/10.14214/sf.5644
Highlights: We present simple and cost-efficient method of SSR genotyping in cherry species; Seven of fifteen previously published primer sequences have been altered in order to produce complementary amplicons in pseudo 15-plex; The effectiveness and discriminatory power of established multiplex were verified by SSRs analysis of 48 wild cherry trees.

Trees from the family Rosaceae play an important role in forest and agricultural ecosystems. Therefore, they are often an object of interest for both forest and horticultural tree breeders. Here, we present the utilization of an effective microsatellite (SSRs) genotyping method for wild cherry (Prunus avium L.) and verified the discriminatory power of the presented multiplex by genotyping 48 genetically distinctive individuals (plus-trees). Concerned loci were previously proven to be cross-compatible among various cultivars of cherry, hence, the method could have a broader utilization beyond to the field of forestry.
Our technique is based on post-PCR processing of 15 polymorphic SSRs loci amplified in three multiplex reactions with fluorescently labeled primers (6-FAM, VIC, PET and NED). All PCR products could be pooled and analyzed simultaneously (pseudo 15-plex). In order to make this approach feasible, we redefined sequences of several primers. Thus, utilizing modified primers provides non-overlapping amplicons of each fluorescent dye.

  • Korecký, Faculty of Forestry and Wood Sciences, Czech University of Life Sciences, Kamýcká 1176, 165 21, Prague, Czech Republic ORCID ID: http://orcid.org/0000-0001-7859-1750 E-mail: korecky@fld.czu.cz (email)
  • Bílý, Faculty of Forestry and Wood Sciences, Czech University of Life Sciences, Kamýcká 1176, 165 21, Prague, Czech Republic ORCID ID: http://orcid.org/0000-0001-5794-0907 E-mail: bily@fld.czu.cz
  • Sedlák, Faculty of Agrobiology, Food and Natural Resources, Czech University of Life Sciences, Kamýcká 129, 165 21, Prague, Czech Republic ORCID ID: http://orcid.org/0000-0001-8016-8900 E-mail: sedlak@af.czu.cz
  • Lstibůrek, Faculty of Forestry and Wood Sciences, Czech University of Life Sciences, Kamýcká 1176, 165 21, Prague, Czech Republic ORCID ID: http://orcid.org/0000-0002-6304-6669 E-mail: lstiburek@fld.czu.cz

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