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Silva Fennica 1926-1997
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Articles containing the keyword 'growth response'.

Category: Research article

article id 453, category Research article
Eduard Schiessl, Michael Grabner, Gerald Golesch, Thomas Geburek, Silvio Schueler. (2010). Sub-montane Norway spruce as alternative seed source for a changing climate? A genetic and growth analysis at the fringe of its natural range in Austria. Silva Fennica vol. 44 no. 4 article id 453. https://doi.org/10.14214/sf.453
Insights into the intraspecific variation in climate response of forest trees and the utilization of suitable seed sources are required to maintain forest ecoystems under expected climate change. Individuals of Norway spruce with an anomalous spherical-shaped crown were characterized by genetic (using a mtDNA marker) and dendroclimatic analysis. Such trees occur frequently at the fringe of the spruce distribution in east/south-east Austria. We employed pair-wise comparisons between trees with spherical and “regular” conical crowns on 47 sites. No evidence was found for a different phylogeographic history of spherical and conical spruces, but the high allelic diversity at the nad1 locus highlighted the importance of east/south-east Austria as refugium and migration corridor for Norway spruce. Analysis of mean annual increment revealed a larger amount of earlywood within the sapwood area and fewer negative pointer years for spherical spruces than for conical ones, pointing at a higher vitality and smaller interactions between climate and growth for spherical spruces. Although the results cannot explain the anomalous crown form, they suggest spherical trees to have a higher ability to cope the warm and dry climate of the region than “regular” conical spruces. We discuss the origin of spherical crowns in terms of population history and phenotypic plasticity and speculate on possible effects of crown architecture on canopy-atmosphere exchange.
  • Schiessl, Department of Genetics, Research and Training Centre for Forests, Natural Hazards and Landscape, Hauptstrasse 7, A-1140 Vienna, Austria ORCID ID:E-mail:
  • Grabner, Department of Material Sciences and Process Engineering, Institute of Wood Science and Technology, University of Natural Resources and Applied Life Sciences, Peter-Jordan-Strasse 82, A-1190 Vienna, Austria ORCID ID:E-mail:
  • Golesch, Department of Genetics, Research and Training Centre for Forests, Natural Hazards and Landscape, Hauptstrasse 7, A-1140 Vienna, Austria ORCID ID:E-mail:
  • Geburek, Department of Genetics, Research and Training Centre for Forests, Natural Hazards and Landscape, Hauptstrasse 7, A-1140 Vienna, Austria ORCID ID:E-mail:
  • Schueler, Department of Genetics, Research and Training Centre for Forests, Natural Hazards and Landscape, Hauptstrasse 7, A-1140 Vienna, Austria ORCID ID:E-mail: silvio.schueler@bfw.gv.at (email)
article id 616, category Research article
Markus Lindholm, Hannu Lehtonen, Taneli Kolström, Jouko Meriläinen, Matti Eronen, Mauri Timonen. (2000). Climatic signals extracted from ring-width chronologies of Scots pines from the northern, middle and southern parts of the boreal forest belt in Finland. Silva Fennica vol. 34 no. 4 article id 616. https://doi.org/10.14214/sf.616
Climatic signals were extracted from ring-width chronologies of Scots pines (Pinus sylvestris L.) from natural stands of the northern, middle, and southern parts of the boreal forest belt in Finland. The strength of the common growth signals (forcing factors) were quantified as a function of time. This was achieved by mean inter-series correlations, calculated over a moving 30-year window, both within and between the regional chronologies. Strong regional signals and also evidence for common forcings were found, especially between northern and central, central and eastern, as well as central/eastern and southern chronologies. Response function analyses revealed that growing season temperatures govern the growth rates of northern pines, while towards south, pine growth becomes less affected by temperatures, and more affected by e.g. precipitation. During some periods, growing conditions seem to have been favorable in the south, while they have been unfavorable in the north (growth inversions). Going from the north to the south, the variability of radial growth clearly decreases, and the variance of ring-width series becomes smaller. Growth variability in the four regions was compared during the common interval of the chronologies, from 1806 to 1991. The spectral densities of the northern, central, eastern and southern chronologies were also compared as functions of frequency, viz. cycles per year. The variance is much greater and there is more periodic behavior in the north than in the south in high, medium, as well as lower frequencies.
  • Lindholm, Saima Centre for Environmental Sciences, University of Joensuu, Linnankatu 11, FIN-57130 Savonlinna, Finland ORCID ID:E-mail:
  • Lehtonen, Finnish Forest Research Institute, Joensuu Research Station, Box 68, FIN-80101 Joensuu, Finland ORCID ID:E-mail:
  • Kolström, Finnish Forest Research Institute, Joensuu Research Station, Box 68, FIN-80101 Joensuu, Finland ORCID ID:E-mail:
  • Meriläinen, Saima Centre for Environmental Sciences, University of Joensuu, Linnankatu 11, FIN-57130 Savonlinna, Finland ORCID ID:E-mail:
  • Eronen, Department of Geology, Division of Geology and Palaeontology, Box 11, FIN-00014 University of Helsinki, Finland ORCID ID:E-mail:
  • Timonen, Finnish Forest Research Institute, Rovaniemi Research Station, Box 16, FIN-96301 Rovaniemi, Finland ORCID ID:E-mail:

Category: Article

article id 5383, category Article
Pasi Miettinen, Aino Smolander. (1989). Growth requirements of Frankia strains isolated from Casuarina equisetifolia, and the influence of the isolates on the growth of the host plant. Silva Fennica vol. 23 no. 3 article id 5383. https://doi.org/10.14214/sf.a15540

Frankia was isolated from the root nodules of Casuarina equisetifolia L. seedlings, grown in a growth chamber, after inoculation with soil originating from an old east Kenyan casuarina forest. Optimum pH for the growth of the two isolates ranged from 6.4 to 6.9. The optimum temperature for their growth was 32°C. The growth of these cultures ceased at NaCl concentration above 2%. The influence of the isolates on the growth of the host plant was determined in a growth chamber experiment in which an American Frankia strain (HFPCc13) was used as a reference. The biomass of the inoculated seedlings was 2.4–4.1 fold those of the non-inoculated control seedlings at the end of the 7-month experiment.

The PDF includes an abstract in Finnish.

  • Miettinen, ORCID ID:E-mail:
  • Smolander, ORCID ID:E-mail:

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