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Articles containing the keyword 'heartwood'.

Category: Research article

article id 1341, category Research article
Přemysl Humplík, Petr Čermák, Tomáš Žid. (2016). Electrical impedance tomography for decay diagnostics of Norway spruce (Picea abies): possibilities and opportunities. Silva Fennica vol. 50 no. 1 article id 1341. https://doi.org/10.14214/sf.1341
Highlights: Statistical parameters of EIT datasets with values of electrical resistance of heartwood are possible to employ in refining heartwood rot diagnostics; Sapwood proportion is decreasing as the proportion of decay on the radial cut expands; Using EIT datasets and sapwood proportion, trees with rot can be split into two groups as per proportion of decay: [< 35%] and [> 35%].

The paper aimed at testing the potential of refining tree rot diagnostics carried out by means of electrical impedance tomography (EIT). Examined was the use of EIT datasets with electrical resistance values and sapwood proportion determined on the basis of tomograms. Making use of datasets with resistance values in EIT rot diagnostics is not a default method, although datasets stay unaffected by a fixed colour scale and subsequent subjective evaluation unlike tomograms. Tomography measurement was carried out for 27 individuals of Norway spruce (Picea abies [L.] Karst.) in two stands north-east of Brno, Czech Republic. Once felled down, radial cut-outs were sampled at the measurement site and used for localising rot and determining the extent of the area of decay. The results were subsequently compared with tomograms. EIT datasets containing values of electrical resistance found by measuring were statistically processed and compared with the extent of rot area identified within the cuts. Sapwood proportion values were also detected using the tomograms. The baseline assumption that sapwood proportion decreases as the rot area in the radial cut expands was confirmed. In trees with rot percentage to 35% approximately, sapwood proportion was exceeding 30% except one tree. In trees with rot percentage exceeding 35%, sapwood proportion was below 30%. On the basis of interpreted datasets, the trees can be split into three characteristic groups that correspond to the occurrence, extent and nature of the rot.

  • Humplík, Mendel University in Brno, Faculty of Forestry and Wood Technology, Zemědělská 1665/3, 613 00 Brno, Czech Republic ORCID ID:E-mail: premysl.humplik@mendelu.cz (email)
  • Čermák, Mendel University in Brno, Faculty of Forestry and Wood Technology, Zemědělská 1665/3, 613 00 Brno, Czech Republic ORCID ID:E-mail: petr.cermak@mendelu.cz
  • Žid, Mendel University in Brno, Faculty of Forestry and Wood Technology, Zemědělská 1665/3, 613 00 Brno, Czech Republic ORCID ID:E-mail: tomas.zid@mendelu.cz
article id 375, category Research article
Edgar Víquez, Diego Pérez. (2005). Effect of pruning on tree growth, yield, and wood properties of Tectona grandis plantations in Costa Rica. Silva Fennica vol. 39 no. 3 article id 375. https://doi.org/10.14214/sf.375
Reduced plantation densities have the effect that obtaining natural pruning and stem straightness are less assured. The physiological process of self-pruning is replaced by manual pruning. Generally, plantations are denser and have more uniform spacing than natural forests. In many, if not most species, natural pruning is never a satisfactory option, even after branch senescence, if production of clear wood is a management objective. Natural pruning can only be considered on a species by species basis. This study reports on the first results of a pruning trial for Tectona grandis L.F. plantations in Costa Rica. The treatments consisted of pruning heights of 3.0, 4.0, and 5.0 meters, and the Control without pruning. Differences among treatments in DBH and total height were significant at 3.2, 5.2, and 6.1 years of age, but not at 7.3 years. Under an intensive pruning regime, a teak tree at rotation (20 years) may yield over 40% of knot-free volume (over 60% of the merchantable tree volume). Current findings open a scope for new management options, aiming at improving stem form and wood quality by means of an intensive pruning regime, without having a detrimental effect on tree growth and stand yield.
  • Víquez, Tropical Agricultural Research and Higher Education Center (CATIE), Apartado 7170 CATIE, Turrialba, Costa Rica ORCID ID:E-mail: eviquez@catie.ac.cr (email)
  • Pérez, Ambiente Tierra S.A., Apartado 733-2250, Tres Ríos, Cartago, Costa Rica ORCID ID:E-mail:
article id 385, category Research article
Diego Pérez, Markku Kanninen. (2005). Effect of thinning on stem form and wood characteristics of teak (Tectona grandis) in a humid tropical site in Costa Rica. Silva Fennica vol. 39 no. 2 article id 385. https://doi.org/10.14214/sf.385
The aim of the study was to evaluate the effects of thinning intensity on wood properties, such as heartwood proportion, wood basic density, and stem form of teak (Tectona grandis L.f.). The thinning trial was established on a teak plantation in a humid tropical site in northern Costa Rica. The moderate and heavy thinnings yielded the highest percentage of heartwood volume (25 to 30% of total stem volume). The differences between stem form factors under different treatments were not statistically significant after separating thinning effects from timing effects. Both the highest (> 0.65 g cm–3) and the lowest (< 0.50 g cm–3) wood density values were observed under light thinnings, making it difficult to establish a relationship. Large variations in wood properties found under different thinning regimes suggest that at early stages teak stands can be managed under different thinning programs without negatively affecting the quality of wood under humid tropical conditions.
  • Pérez, Ambiente Tierra S.A., Apartado 733-2250, Tres Ríos, Cartago, Costa Rica ORCID ID:E-mail: diegoperez@costarricense.cr (email)
  • Kanninen, Center for International Forestry Research (CIFOR), Bogor, Indonesia ORCID ID:E-mail:
article id 525, category Research article
Thomas Knoke. (2002). Value of complete information on red heartwood formation in beech (Fagus sylvatica). Silva Fennica vol. 36 no. 4 article id 525. https://doi.org/10.14214/sf.525
Beech (Fagus sylvatica L.) is the most important deciduous tree species in Germany. The wood of beech shows normally a bright colour (white beech) as long as no coloured heartwood has been formed. The facultative heartwood formation is induced when oxygen enters central parts of older trees, where dead or at least less vital parenchyma exist. The coloured heartwood is usually called ‘red heartwood’. Beech without red heartwood can preferably be found in younger trees which show a high water content even in central parts of the stem. The presence of red heartwood is regarded as a severe reduction of timber quality. Numerous studies have investigated opportunities to derive information on the presence and characteristics of red heartwood of standing beech trees. But until now it has not been tested whether such information could be helpful to improve the economics of beech-silviculture. This paper investigates whether complete information on the heartwood of standing beech could be useful to control the proportion of discoloured timber harvested during one rotation. It is also examined, which kind of information on the heartwood could be used to improve the economic results. To verify this, simulations based on simple algorithms were conducted. The general assumption was made that all information on the heartwood would be available. The results show that information which is restricted on the mere existence of red heartwood is neither suited to significantly reduce the amount of coloured timber nor is it possible to improve economic results based on this information. Only based on information on the recent formation of red heartwood of beech, which is actually still white the amount of discoloured timber can be reduced significantly. Consequently the discounted cash flows can only be substantially improved based on information on an expected formation of recent red heartwood.
  • Knoke, Institute of Silviculture and Forest Management, Technische Universität München, Am Hochanger 13, D-85354 Freising, Germany ORCID ID:E-mail: knoke@wbfe.forst.tu-muenchen.de (email)
article id 662, category Research article
Lars Björklund. (1999). Identifying heartwood-rich stands or stems of Pinus sylvestris by using inventory data. Silva Fennica vol. 33 no. 2 article id 662. https://doi.org/10.14214/sf.662
Variations in heartwood percentage, heartwood radius and sapwood width, within and between stands of Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris L.), were analysed using a database of 198 CT-scanned (computer tomography) stems from 33 research plots (stands) throughout Sweden. Heartwood percentage varied greatly both between individual trees and between stands, and correlated poorly to site, stand and tree variables. This implies that it seems unfeasible to identify heartwood-rich stands or stems, e.g., for production of heartwood products, by using inventory data. Heartwood formation expressed as the number of new heartwood rings formed each year was found to increase with increasing cambial age, from about 0.5 rings per year at a cambial age of 45 years, to about 0.8 rings per year at a cambial age of 115 years.
  • Björklund, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Department of Forest Management and Products, S-750 07 Uppsala, Sweden ORCID ID:E-mail: lars.bjorklund@sh.slu.se (email)

Category: Article

article id 5310, category Article
Petri Kärenlampi. (1987). Puun lahonkestävyys ja kosteusdynamiikka. Silva Fennica vol. 21 no. 2 article id 5310. https://doi.org/10.14214/sf.a15467
English title: The decay resistance and moisture dynamics of wood.

In laboratory studies the heartwood content seems to be the only natural property of a wood of different tree species influencing the decay resistance. Moistening and drying by diffusion happen quite slowly. Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris L.) sapwood takes moisture by capillary action quicker than pine heartwood and Norway spruce (Picea abies (L.) H. Karst.) wood. Swelling and shrinkage are also greatest in pine sapwood. Impregnation of pine sapwood can give it better hydrophobic and dimensional stability than that of pine heartwood.

The PDF includes an abstract in English.

  • Kärenlampi, ORCID ID:E-mail:
article id 5259, category Article
Kari Löyttyniemi, Olli Uusvaara. (1986). Further tests for termite resistance of Finnish pine heartwood. Silva Fennica vol. 20 no. 1 article id 5259. https://doi.org/10.14214/sf.a15438

The natural resistance of Finnish-grown Pinus sylvestris L. heartwood to Macrotermitinae termites was tested in Zambia in graveyard conditions. The heartwood exhibited some natural resistance but durability was, however, far from practical immunity. There was significant tree-to-tree variation in the resistance of heartwood of P. Sylvestris.

The PDF includes a summary in Finnish.

  • Löyttyniemi, ORCID ID:E-mail:
  • Uusvaara, ORCID ID:E-mail:
article id 4872, category Article
Matti Kärkkäinen. (1972). Kuusen ja männyn sydänpuuosuudesta. Silva Fennica vol. 6 no. 3 article id 4872. https://doi.org/10.14214/sf.a14679
English title: The proportion of heartwood in Norway spruce (Picea abies) and Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris).
Original keywords: kuusi; mänty; sydänpuu; kuitupuu; läpimitta

The study deals with the variation in the proportion of heartwood  in Norway spruce (Picea abies (L.) H. Karst.) and Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris L.) both within and between stems as examined on the basis of literature. Special attention is paid to an application, in which on the basis of the diameter of pulpwood bolts, efforts are made to predict the proportion of heartwood in the total volume of bolts. It is shown that the method, even when based on homogenous material of 564 Norway spruce and Scots pine bolts, easily leads to wrong conclusions concerning the proportion of heartwood.

The PDF includes a summary in English.

  • Kärkkäinen, ORCID ID:E-mail:
article id 7681, category Article
Eero Nikinmaa. (1992). Analyses of the growth of Scots pine: matching structure with function. Acta Forestalia Fennica no. 235 article id 7681. https://doi.org/10.14214/aff.7681

A theoretical framework to analyse the growth of Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris L.) is presented. Material exchange processes and internal processes that transport, transform and consume materials are identified as the components of growth. Hierarchical system is lined out. Momentary uptake of material at a single exchange site depends on the environmental condition next to the exchange site, the internal state of the biochemical system of the plant and the structure of the plant. The internal state depends on the exchange flows over period of time and the structural growth depends on the internal state. The response of these processes to the fluxes is controlled by the genetic composition of the plant.

The theoretical framework is formulated into a mathematical model. A concept of balanced internal state was applied to describe the poorly known internal processes. Internal substrate concentrations were assumed to remain constant but tissue-specific. A linear relationship between the quantity of foliage and wood cross-sectional area was assumed to describe balanced formation of structure. The exchange processes were thus described as a function of external conditions. The stand level interactions were derived from shading and effects of root density on nutrient uptake.

The approach was tested at different levels of hierarchy. Field measurements indicated that the hypothesis of the linear relationship described well the regularities between foliage and sapwood of a tree within a stand when measured at functionally corresponding height. There was considerable variation in the observed regularities in the range of geographic occurrence of Scots pine. Model simulations gave a realistic description of stand development in Southern Finland. The same model was also able to describe growth differences in Lapland after considering the effect of growing season length in the parameter values. Simulations to South Russia indicate stronger deviation from the observed patterns.

The simulations suggest interesting features of stand development. They indicate strong variability in the distribution of carbohydrates between tree parts during stand development. Internal circulation of nutrients and the reuse of the same transport structure by various needle generations had a strong influence on the simulation results.

The PDF includes a summary in Finnish.

  • Nikinmaa, ORCID ID:E-mail:

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