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Articles containing the keyword 'optimization'.

Category: Research article

article id 10062, category Research article
Jouni Siipilehto, Miika Rajala. (2019). Model for diameter distribution from assortments volumes: theoretical formulation and a case application with a sample of timber trade data for clear-cut sections. Silva Fennica vol. 53 no. 1 article id 10062. https://doi.org/10.14214/sf.10062
Highlights: The Weibull distribution was solved successfully from assortment volumes using optimization; The solved distribution provided accurate assortment volume when the input variables were correct; Goodness-of-fit tests indicate the compatibility between the solved distribution and the cut trees, according to harvester data; Timber trade contracts showed overestimated average merchantable tree sizes, which resulted in an underestimation of the number of cut trees; The reason for underestimation seemed to be in the decreasing distributions.

This study examined a theoretical model for stand structures from the volumes of pulpwood and saw logs of clear-cut stands. The average stem size was used to estimate the number of cut trees. The distribution was solved using nonlinear derivative-free optimization. The truncated 2-parameter Weibull distribution was used to describe the stand structure of the commercial stems. This method was first tested with harvester data collected from seven clear-cut stands in southern Finland. Validation included reliability in the stand characteristics and goodness-of-fit of the species-specific distributions. The distributions provided unbiased estimates for the saw log volume, while the bias in the estimated pulpwood volume was 2%. The standard stand characteristics from the Weibull distributions corresponded notably well with the harvester data. A Kolmogorov-Smirnov (KS) test rejected two distributions out of 21 cases, when the accurate input variables were available for the theoretical model. The results of the study suggest that the presented method is a relevant option for predicting the stand structure. In practice, the reliability of the presented method was dependent on the quality of the information available from the stand prior to cutting. With a timber trade data set, the solution for the distribution for a clear-cut section was found. The goodness-of-fit was dependent on the accuracy of the visually assessed timber trade variables. Especially the average stem size proved difficult to assess due to high number of understorey pulpwood stems. Due to overestimated average stem sizes, the solved number of harvested trees was underestimated. Less than 50% of the distributions predicted for clear-cut sections passed the KS test.

  • Siipilehto, Natural Resources Institute Finland (Luke), Latokartanonkaari 9, P.O. Box 2, FI-00790 Helsinki, Finland ORCID ID:E-mail: jouni.siipilehto@luke.fi (email)
  • Rajala, Metsä Group, Revontulenpuisto 2, P.O. Box 10, 02020 METSÄ, FI-02100 Espoo, Finland ORCID ID:E-mail: miika.rajala@metsagroup.com
article id 7803, category Research article
Lingbo Dong, Pete Bettinger, Huiyan Qin, Zhaogang Liu. (2018). Reflections on the number of independent solutions for forest spatial harvest scheduling problems: a case of simulated annealing. Silva Fennica vol. 52 no. 1 article id 7803. https://doi.org/10.14214/sf.7803
Highlights: No one particular neighborhood search technique of simulated annealing was found to be universally acceptable; The optimal number of independent solutions necessary for addressing the area restriction harvest scheduling model was described with a negative logarithmic function that was related with the problem size. However, optimal number of independent solutions necessary was not sensitive to the problem size for non-spatial and unit restriction harvest scheduling model problems, which should be somewhat above 250 independent runs; The types of adjacency constraints have moderate effects on the number of independent solutions, but these effects are not significant.

To assess the quality of results obtained from heuristics through statistical procedures, a number of independently generated solutions to the same problem are required, however the knowledge of how many solutions are necessary for this purpose using a specific heuristic is still not clear. Therefore, the overall aims of this paper are to quantitatively evaluate the effects of the number of independent solutions generated on the forest planning objectives and on the performance of different neighborhood search techniques of simulated annealing (SA) in three increasing difficult forest spatial harvest scheduling problems, namely non-spatial model, area restriction model (ARM) and unit restriction model (URM). The tested neighborhood search techniques included the standard version of SA using the conventional 1-opt moves, SA using the combined strategy that oscillates between the conventional 1-opt moves and the exchange version of 2-opt moves, and SA using the change version of 2-opt moves. The obtained results indicated that the number of independent solutions generated had clear effects on the conclusions of the performances of different neighborhood search techniques of SA, which indicated that no one particular neighborhood search technique of SA was universally acceptable. The optimal number of independent solutions generated for all alternative neighborhood search techniques of SA for ARM problems could be estimated using a negative logarithmic function based on the problem size, however the relationships were not sensitive (i.e., 0.13 < p < 0.78) to the problem size for non-spatial and URM harvest scheduling problems, which should be somewhat above 250 independent runs. The types of adjacency constraints did moderately affect the number of independent solutions necessary, but not significantly. Therefore, determining an optimal number of independent solutions generated is a necessary process prior to employing heuristics in forest management planning practices.

  • Dong, College of Forestry, Northeast Forestry University, Harbin 150040, China ORCID ID:E-mail: farrell0503@126.com
  • Bettinger, Warnell School of Forestry and Natural Resources, University of Georgia, Athens 30602, GA, USA ORCID ID:E-mail: pbettinger@warnell.uga.edu
  • Qin, College of Economic and Management, Northeast Forestry University, Harbin 150040, China ORCID ID:E-mail: huiyanqin@hotmail.com
  • Liu, College of Forestry, Northeast Forestry University, Harbin 150040, China ORCID ID:E-mail: lzg19700602@163.com (email)
article id 1622, category Research article
Lingbo Dong, Pete Bettinger, Zhaogang Liu, Huiyan Qin, Yinghui Zhao. (2016). Evaluating the neighborhood, hybrid and reversion search techniques of a simulated annealing algorithm in solving forest spatial harvest scheduling problems. Silva Fennica vol. 50 no. 4 article id 1622. https://doi.org/10.14214/sf.1622
Highlights: The performances of neighborhood, hybrid and reversion search strategies of simulated annealing were evaluated when implemented with a forest spatial harvest scheduling problem; The performances of alternative search strategies of simulated annealing were all systematic and clear better than the conventional strategy; The reversion techniques were significant superior to the other search strategies in solving forest spatial harvest scheduling problems.

Heuristic techniques have been increasingly used to address the complex forest planning problems over the last few decades. However, heuristics only can provide acceptable solutions to difficult problems, rather than guarantee that the optimal solution will be located. The strategies of neighborhood, hybrid and reversion search processes have been proved to be effective in improving the quality of heuristic results, as suggested recently in the literature. The overall aims of this paper were therefore to systematically evaluate the performances of these enhanced techniques when implemented with a simulated annealing algorithm. Five enhanced techniques were developed using different strategies for generating candidate solutions. These were then compared to the conventional search strategy that employed 1-opt moves (Strategy 1) alone. The five search strategies are classified into three categories: i) neighborhood search techniques that only used the change version of 2-opt moves (Strategy 2); ii) self-hybrid search techniques that oscillate between 1-opt moves and the change version of 2-opt moves (Strategy 3), or the exchange version of 2-opt moves (Strategy 4); iii) reversion search techniques that utilize 1-opt moves and the change version of 2-opt moves (Strategy 5) or the exchange version of 2-opt moves (Strategy 6). We found that the performances of all the enhanced search techniques of simulated annealing were systematic and often clear better than conventional search strategy, however the required computational time was significantly increased. For a minimization planning problem, Strategy 6 produced the lowest mean objective function values, which were less than 1% of the means developed using conventional search strategy. Although Strategy 6 performed very well, the other search strategies should not be neglected because they also have the potential to produce high-quality solutions.

  • Dong, Department of Forest Management, College of Forestry, Northeast Forestry University, Harbin 150040, China ORCID ID:E-mail: farrell0503@126.com
  • Bettinger, Warnell School of Forestry and Natural Resources, University of Georgia, Athens 30602, GA, USA ORCID ID:E-mail: pbettinger@warnell.uga.edu
  • Liu, Department of Forest Management, College of Forestry, Northeast Forestry University, Harbin 150040, China ORCID ID:E-mail: lzg19700602@163.com (email)
  • Qin, Department of Forestry Economic, College of Economic & Management, Northeast Forestry University, Harbin 150040, China ORCID ID:E-mail: huiyanqin@hotmail.com
  • Zhao, Department of Forest Management, College of Forestry, Northeast Forestry University, Harbin 150040, China ORCID ID:E-mail: zyinghui0925@126.com
article id 937, category Research article
Rene Zamora-Cristales, Kevin Boston, John Sessions, Glen Murphy. (2013). Stochastic simulation and optimization of mobile chipping economics in processing and transport of forest biomass from residues. Silva Fennica vol. 47 no. 5 article id 937. https://doi.org/10.14214/sf.937
Highlights: A stochastic simulation model is proposed to analyze forest biomass operations; The cost of chipper and truck waiting times was estimated in forest biomass recovery operations; The economic effect of truck-machine interactions under uncertainty was analyzed; Road characteristics and processing location have an economic impact in truck and chipper waiting times
We analyzed the economics of mobile chipping and transport of biomass from forest residues for energy purposes under uncertainty. A discrete-event simulation model was developed and utilized to quantify the impacts of controllable and environmental variables on productivity in order to determine the most cost effective transportation options under steep terrain conditions. Truck-chipper interactions were analyzed to show their effect on truck and chipper standing time. A costing model was developed to account for operating and standing time cost (for the chipper and trucks). The model used information from time studies of each activity in the productive cycle and spatial-temporal information obtained from geographic information system (GIS) devices, and tracking analysis of machine and truck movements. The model was validated in field operations, and proved to be accurate in providing the expected productivity. A cost distribution was elaborated to support operational decisions of forest managers, landowners and risk-averse contractors. Different scenarios were developed to illustrate the economic effects due to changes in road characteristics such as in-highway transport distance, in-forest internal road distance and pile to trailer chipper traveling distances.
  • Zamora-Cristales, Department of Forest Engineering, Resources, and Management, College of Forestry, Oregon State University, 280 Peavy Hall, Corvallis, OR 97331, USA ORCID ID:E-mail: rene.zamora@oregonstate.edu (email)
  • Boston, Department of Forest Engineering, Resources, and Management, College of Forestry, Oregon State University, 280 Peavy Hall, Corvallis, OR 97331, USA ORCID ID:E-mail: kevin.boston@oregonstate.edu
  • Sessions, Department of Forest Engineering, Resources, and Management, College of Forestry, Oregon State University, 280 Peavy Hall, Corvallis, OR 97331, USA ORCID ID:E-mail: john.sessions@oregonstate.edu
  • Murphy, Waiariki Institute of Technology, Rotorua, New Zealand ORCID ID:E-mail: glen.murphy@waiariki.ac.nz
article id 1006, category Research article
Jörn Rathke, Maria A. Huka, Manfred Gronalt. (2013). The box assignment problem in log yards. Silva Fennica vol. 47 no. 3 article id 1006. https://doi.org/10.14214/sf.1006
Highlights: Logistic approach for the optimization of log yard in terms of arrangement of storage boxes and ejection boxes reduced transportation time by 16 percent compared with the original solution.
This paper presents an optimization approach to minimizing log yard round wood transportation time for a medium sized hardwood sawmill. The log yard, which has to ensure a smooth raw material supply to the entire production process, is the first processing step in a sawmill. The log yard also serves as an internal round wood sorting and storing capacity. Thus, an optimal assignment of ejection boxes, storage boxes and feeding carriages is required to minimize transportation time at a log yard. The main contribution of this paper is to present an integrated approach which simultaneously takes into account log transportation time, storage capacity and yard crane deployment. The approach is based on two steps: a) defining storage spaces per batch and calculating distances and b) determining optimum box assignments in the log yard in order to minimize overall transportation distance. The solution in step b) is compared with the results obtained by random box assignment as well as a spreadsheet based planning method. We have been able to show that our approach is much more flexible and results are more than 16 percent better than the corresponding real life solution.
  • Rathke, University of Natural Resources and Life Sciences, Institute of Production and Logistics, Feistmantelstraße 4, 1180 Vienna, Austria ORCID ID:E-mail: joern.rathke@boku.ac.at
  • Huka, University of Natural Resources and Life Sciences, Institute of Production and Logistics, Feistmantelstraße 4, 1180 Vienna, Austria ORCID ID:E-mail: maria.huka@boku.ac.at (email)
  • Gronalt, University of Natural Resources and Life Sciences, Institute of Production and Logistics, Feistmantelstraße 4, 1180 Vienna, Austria ORCID ID:E-mail: manfred.gronalt@boku.ac.at
article id 457, category Research article
Karin Öhman, Ljusk Ola Eriksson. (2010). Aggregating harvest activities in long term forest planning by minimizing harvest area perimeters. Silva Fennica vol. 44 no. 1 article id 457. https://doi.org/10.14214/sf.457
The study presents a new approach for aggregating stands for harvest in strategic forest planning. In fragmented landscapes this could benefit nature conservation as well as reduce costs. The approach is built on the idea of minimizing the outside perimeter of contiguous harvest areas. The formulation allows for the use of exact solution methods such as mixed integer programming. The method was tested in a landscape consisting of 2821 stands. The application showed that large and compact harvest areas were created with limited sacrifice of financial value. The mixed integer programs were in most cases solved within a couple of hours. The method needs to be tested on different landscapes with different degrees of fragmentation. It is also necessary to evaluate the long term consequences of the large clear cuts that appear to be a consequence of this problem formulation.
  • Öhman, SLU, Department of Forest Resource Management, SE-901 83 Umeå, Sweden ORCID ID:E-mail: karin.ohman@srh.slu.se (email)
  • Eriksson, SLU, Department of Forest Resource Management, SE-901 83 Umeå, Sweden ORCID ID:E-mail:
article id 176, category Research article
María Pasalodos-Tato, Timo Pukkala, Antonio Rigueiro-Rodríguez, Esther Fernández-Nunez, María Rosa Mosquera-Losada. (2009). Optimal management of Pinus radiata silvopastoral systems established on abandoned agricultural land in Galicia (north-western Spain). Silva Fennica vol. 43 no. 5 article id 176. https://doi.org/10.14214/sf.176
Timber production has been the main objective in forest production in Galicia for a long time. Nevertheless, factors such as fire risk and the need to obtain non-timber benefits make other production alternatives like silvopastoral systems worth of consideration. Integration of grazing in the production system not only diversifies products and benefits, but also decreases fire risk by enhancing fuel control. Nonetheless, few studies have examined the economic profitability of these systems. This article analyses the economics of silvopastoral systems established on abandoned agricultural soils afforested with Pinus radiata D. Don. Different tree planting densities, discounting rates, grass values and fire risk scenarios were analysed. The technique employed is based on the combination of an optimization algorithm and a simulator of stand growth and grass yield. The most profitable schedules were obtained with initial stand densities of 1500 trees per hectare. However, with high unit values of pasture production (high value of grass), schedules with an initial stand density of 500 trees per hectare were the most profitable. When the risk of fire was included in the analyses, silvopastoral systems were always more profitable than timber production systems. With an assumption that grazing reduces fire risk thinnings should be done earlier and heavier to reduce the expected losses due to fire and to promote grass production. This lengthens the pasture period. In general, rotation lengt
  • Pasalodos-Tato, INIA, Instituto Nacional de Investigación y Tecnología Agraria y Alimentaria. Madrid, Spain ORCID ID:E-mail: pasalodos.maria@inia.es (email)
  • Pukkala, University of East Finland, Joensuu, Finland ORCID ID:E-mail:
  • Rigueiro-Rodríguez, University of Santiago de Compostela, Lugo, Spain ORCID ID:E-mail:
  • Fernández-Nunez, University of Santiago de Compostela, Lugo, Spain ORCID ID:E-mail:
  • Mosquera-Losada, University of Santiago de Compostela, Lugo, Spain ORCID ID:E-mail:
article id 201, category Research article
Rui Qi, Véronique Letort, Mengzhen Kang, Paul-Henry Cournède, Philippe de Reffye, Thierry Fourcaud. (2009). Application of the GreenLab model to simulate and optimize wood production and tree stability: a theoretical study. Silva Fennica vol. 43 no. 3 article id 201. https://doi.org/10.14214/sf.201
The GreenLab model was used to study the interaction between source-sink dynamics at the whole tree level, wood production and distribution within the stem, and tree mechanical stability through simulation and optimization. In this first promising numerical attempt, two GreenLab parameters were considered in order to maximize wood production: the sink strength for cambial growth and a coefficient that determines the way the biomass assigned to cambial growth is allocated to each metamer, through optimization and simulation respectively. The optimization procedure that has been used is based on a heuristic optimization algorithm called Particle Swarm Optimization (PSO). In the first part of the paper, wood production was maximized without considering the effect of wood distribution on tree mechanical stability. Contrary to common idea that increasing sink strength for cambial growth leads to increasing wood production, an optimal value can be found. The optimization results implied that an optimal source and sink balance should be considered to optimize wood production. In a further step, the mechanical stability of trees submitted to their self weight was taken into account based on simplified mechanical assumptions. Simulation results revealed that the allocation of wood at the stem base strongly influenced its global deformation. Such basic mechanical criterion can be an indicator of wood quality if we consider further the active biomechanical processes involved in tree gravitropic responses, e.g. formation of reaction wood.
  • Qi, Ecole Centrale Paris, Laboratory of Applied Mathematics, Grande Voie des Vignes, 92295 Chatenay-Malabry, France; Institute of Automation, Chinese Academy of Sciences, LIAMA/NLPR, P.O.Box 2728, Beijing, China ORCID ID:E-mail: qiruitree@gmail.com (email)
  • Letort, Ecole Centrale Paris, Laboratory of Applied Mathematics, Grande Voie des Vignes, 92295 Chatenay-Malabry, France ORCID ID:E-mail:
  • Kang, Institute of Automation, Chinese Academy of Sciences, LIAMA/NLPR, P.O.Box 2728, Beijing, China ORCID ID:E-mail:
  • Cournède, Ecole Centrale Paris, Laboratory of Applied Mathematics, Grande Voie des Vignes, 92295 Chatenay-Malabry, France; INRIA saclay Ile-de-France, EPI Digiplant, Parc Orsay Université, 91893 Orsay cedex, France ORCID ID:E-mail:
  • Reffye, INRIA saclay Ile-de-France, EPI Digiplant, Parc Orsay Université, 91893 Orsay cedex, France; CIRAD, UMR AMAP, Montpellier, F-34000 France ORCID ID:E-mail:
  • Fourcaud, CIRAD, UMR AMAP, Montpellier, F-34000 France ORCID ID:E-mail:
article id 201, category Research article
Rui Qi, Véronique Letort, Mengzhen Kang, Paul-Henry Cournède, Philippe de Reffye, Thierry Fourcaud. (2009). Application of the GreenLab model to simulate and optimize wood production and tree stability: a theoretical study. Silva Fennica vol. 43 no. 3 article id 201. https://doi.org/10.14214/sf.201
The GreenLab model was used to study the interaction between source-sink dynamics at the whole tree level, wood production and distribution within the stem, and tree mechanical stability through simulation and optimization. In this first promising numerical attempt, two GreenLab parameters were considered in order to maximize wood production: the sink strength for cambial growth and a coefficient that determines the way the biomass assigned to cambial growth is allocated to each metamer, through optimization and simulation respectively. The optimization procedure that has been used is based on a heuristic optimization algorithm called Particle Swarm Optimization (PSO). In the first part of the paper, wood production was maximized without considering the effect of wood distribution on tree mechanical stability. Contrary to common idea that increasing sink strength for cambial growth leads to increasing wood production, an optimal value can be found. The optimization results implied that an optimal source and sink balance should be considered to optimize wood production. In a further step, the mechanical stability of trees submitted to their self weight was taken into account based on simplified mechanical assumptions. Simulation results revealed that the allocation of wood at the stem base strongly influenced its global deformation. Such basic mechanical criterion can be an indicator of wood quality if we consider further the active biomechanical processes involved in tree gravitropic responses, e.g. formation of reaction wood.
  • Qi, Ecole Centrale Paris, Laboratory of Applied Mathematics, Grande Voie des Vignes, 92295 Chatenay-Malabry, France; Institute of Automation, Chinese Academy of Sciences, LIAMA/NLPR, P.O.Box 2728, Beijing, China ORCID ID:E-mail: qiruitree@gmail.com (email)
  • Letort, Ecole Centrale Paris, Laboratory of Applied Mathematics, Grande Voie des Vignes, 92295 Chatenay-Malabry, France ORCID ID:E-mail:
  • Kang, Institute of Automation, Chinese Academy of Sciences, LIAMA/NLPR, P.O.Box 2728, Beijing, China ORCID ID:E-mail:
  • Cournède, Ecole Centrale Paris, Laboratory of Applied Mathematics, Grande Voie des Vignes, 92295 Chatenay-Malabry, France; INRIA saclay Ile-de-France, EPI Digiplant, Parc Orsay Université, 91893 Orsay cedex, France ORCID ID:E-mail:
  • Reffye, INRIA saclay Ile-de-France, EPI Digiplant, Parc Orsay Université, 91893 Orsay cedex, France; CIRAD, UMR AMAP, Montpellier, F-34000 France ORCID ID:E-mail:
  • Fourcaud, CIRAD, UMR AMAP, Montpellier, F-34000 France ORCID ID:E-mail:
article id 211, category Research article
Timo Pukkala. (2009). Population-based methods in the optimization of stand management. Silva Fennica vol. 43 no. 2 article id 211. https://doi.org/10.14214/sf.211
In Finland, the growth and yield models for tree stands are simulation programs that consist of several sub-models. These models are often non-smooth and non-differentiable. Direct search methods such as the Hooke-Jeeves algorithm (HJ) are suitable tools for optimizing stand management with this kind of complicated models. This study tested a new class of direct search methods, namely population-based methods, in the optimization of stand management. The tested methods were differential evolution, particle swarm optimization, evolution strategy, and the Nelder-Mead method. All these methods operate with a population of solution vectors, which are recombined and mutated to obtain new candidate solutions. The management schedule of 719 stands was optimized with all population-based methods and with the HJ method. The population-based methods were competitive with the HJ method, producing 0.57% to 1.74% higher mean objective function values than HJ. On the average, differential evolution was the best method, followed by particle swarm optimization, evolution strategy, and Nelder-Mead method. However, differences between the methods were small, and each method was the best in several stands. HJ was alone the best method in 7% of stands, and a population based method in 3% (Nelder-Mead) to 29% (differential evolution) of stands. All five methods found the same solution in 18% of stands.
  • Pukkala, University of Joensuu, Faculty of Forest Sciences, P.O. Box 111, FI-80101 Joensuu, Finland ORCID ID:E-mail: timo.pukkala@joensuu.fi (email)
article id 464, category Research article
Christian Kanzian, Franz Holzleitner, Karl Stampfer, Sarah Ashton. (2009). Regional energy wood logistics – optimizing local fuel supply. Silva Fennica vol. 43 no. 1 article id 464. https://doi.org/10.14214/sf.464
The promotion of electric energy production from solid biomass by the Austrian government has lead to a boom in the construction of new combined heat and power plants. The current total demand for wood chips in the research area for energy purposes is 70 400 m3 of loose volume chips per year. The expected increase in demand due to these new plants is more than 4 times greater than current demand: up to 302 700 m3 of loose volume per year. Even if the energy wood feedstock potential is satisfactory, the design of the supply chain is still unresolved. The aim of this study is to give decision-makers a base for further development. To accomplish this, we designed and tested four different supply scenarios: one for 9 plants and one for 16 plants. The scenarios were developed using a combination of geographic information systems (GIS) and linear programming methods. The results indicate that direct transport of solid fuel wood as round wood and chipping at the plant is the cheapest supply system with a resulting cost of 5.6–6.6 EUR/m3 loose. Using harvesting residues can only be recommended for large plants because of poor fuel quality. In this case, residues would be chipped at or near the landing, piled and transported via self-loading trucks at a cost between 8.4 and 9.1 EUR/m3 loose. In order to meet increasing demand and to ensure a continuous supply, especially during the winter and spring seasons it is necessary to optimize the supply chain by including storage terminals. However, using terminals and increased demand both lead to higher logistical costs. For example, if the total volume is handled via terminals, the average supply costs including storage will increase by 26%. Higher demand increases the costs by 24%.
  • Kanzian, University of Applied Life Sciences Vienna, Institute of Forest Engineering, Peter Jordan Strasse 82, A-1190 Vienna, Austria ORCID ID:E-mail: christian.kanzian@boku.ac.at (email)
  • Holzleitner, University of Applied Life Sciences Vienna, Institute of Forest Engineering, Peter Jordan Strasse 82, A-1190 Vienna, Austria ORCID ID:E-mail:
  • Stampfer, University of Applied Life Sciences Vienna, Institute of Forest Engineering, Peter Jordan Strasse 82, A-1190 Vienna, Austria ORCID ID:E-mail:
  • Ashton, Southern Regional Extension Forestry, Forestry Bldg. 4-420, University of Georgia, Athens, GA 30602, USA ORCID ID:E-mail:
article id 299, category Research article
Hongcheng Zeng, Timo Pukkala, Heli Peltola, Seppo Kellomäki. (2007). Application of ant colony optimization for the risk management of wind damage in forest planning. Silva Fennica vol. 41 no. 2 article id 299. https://doi.org/10.14214/sf.299
Ant colony optimization (ACO) is still quite a new technique and seldom used in the field of forest planning compared to other heuristics such as simulated annealing and genetic algorithms. This work was aimed at evaluating the suitability of ACO for optimizing the clear-cut patterns of a forest landscape when aiming at simultaneously minimizing the risk of wind damage and maintaining sustainable and even flow of periodical harvests. For this purpose, the ACO was first revised and the algorithm was coded using the Visual Basic Application of the ArcGIS software. Thereafter, the performance of the modified ACO was demonstrated in a forest located in central Finland using a 30-year planning period. Its performance was compared to simulated annealing and a genetic algorithm. The revised ACO performed logically since the objective function value was improving and the algorithm was converging during the optimization process. The solutions maintained a quite even periodical harvesting timber while minimizing the risk of wind damage. Implementing the solution would result in smooth landscape in terms of stand height after the 30-year planning period. The algorithm is quite sensitive to the parameters controlling pheromone updating and schedule selecting. It is comparable in solution quality to simulated annealing and genetic algorithms.
  • Zeng, University of Joensuu, Faculty of Forest Sciences, P. O. Box 111, FI-80101 Joensuu, Finland ORCID ID:E-mail: hongcheng.zeng@joensuu.fi (email)
  • Pukkala, University of Joensuu, Faculty of Forest Sciences, P. O. Box 111, FI-80101 Joensuu, Finland ORCID ID:E-mail:
  • Peltola, University of Joensuu, Faculty of Forest Sciences, P. O. Box 111, FI-80101 Joensuu, Finland ORCID ID:E-mail:
  • Kellomäki, University of Joensuu, Faculty of Forest Sciences, P. O. Box 111, FI-80101 Joensuu, Finland ORCID ID:E-mail:
article id 318, category Research article
Sofia Backéus, Peder Wikström, Tomas Lämås. (2006). Modeling carbon sequestration and timber production in a regional case study. Silva Fennica vol. 40 no. 4 article id 318. https://doi.org/10.14214/sf.318
Forests make up large ecosystems and by the uptake of carbon dioxide can play an important role in mitigating the greenhouse effect. In this study, mitigation of carbon emissions through carbon uptake and storage in forest biomass and the use of forest biofuel for fossil fuel substitution were considered. The analysis was performed for a 3.2 million hectare region in northern Sweden. The objective was to maximize net present value for harvested timber, biofuel production and carbon sequestration. A carbon price for build-up of carbon storage and for emissions from harvested forest products was introduced to achieve an economic value for carbon sequestration. Forest development was simulated using an optimizing stand-level planning model, and the solution for the whole region was found using linear programming. A range of carbon prices was used to study the effect on harvest levels and carbon sequestration. At a zero carbon price, the mean annual harvest level was 5.4 million m3, the mean annual carbon sequestration in forest biomass was 1.48 million tonnes and the mean annual replacement of carbon from fossil fuel with forest biofuel was 61 000 tonnes. Increasing the carbon price led to decreasing harvest levels of timber and decreasing harvest levels of forest biofuel. Also, thinning activities decreased more than clear-cut activities when the carbon prices increased. The level of carbon sequestration was governed by the harvest level and the site productivity. This led to varying results for different parts of the region.
  • Backéus, SLU, Dept. of Forest Resource Management and Geomatics, SE-901 83 Umeå, Sweden ORCID ID:E-mail: sofia.backeus@resgeom.slu.se (email)
  • Wikström, SLU, Dept. of Forest Resource Management and Geomatics, SE-901 83 Umeå, Sweden ORCID ID:E-mail:
  • Lämås, SLU, Dept. of Forest Resource Management and Geomatics, SE-901 83 Umeå, Sweden ORCID ID:E-mail:
article id 429, category Research article
Juho Rantala. (2004). Optimizing the supply chain strategy of a multi-unit Finnish nursery company. Silva Fennica vol. 38 no. 2 article id 429. https://doi.org/10.14214/sf.429
This paper introduces a capacitated mixed integer programming (CMIP) model for solving an integrated production-distribution system design problem (PDSDP) in the seedling supply chain management (SCM) of a multi-unit Finnish nursery company. The model was originally developed from a strategic perspective in which a company desires to evaluate the expansion or closure of its facilities. Nevertheless, the model is also used for solving operational and tactical level problems by applying applicable constraints. The data were collected from the company studied. The results proved that economies of scale could be exploited in seedling production more than the company does today; Compared to the company’s current supply chain strategy with 5 nursery units producing seedlings, when other supply chain strategies were applied the number of nursery units decreased by 2–4 units, and cost savings in the supply chain varied from 11.3% to 21.3%.
  • Rantala, Finnish Forest Research Institute, Suonenjoki Research Station, Juntintie 154, FI-77600 Suonenjoki, Finland ORCID ID:E-mail: juho.rantala@metla.fi (email)
article id 529, category Research article
Tuula Aalto, Pertti Hari, Timo Vesala. (2002). Comparison of an optimal stomatal regulation model and a biochemical model in explaining CO2 exchange in field conditions. Silva Fennica vol. 36 no. 3 article id 529. https://doi.org/10.14214/sf.529
Gas exchange of Pinus sylvestris L. was studied in subarctic field conditions. Aspects on optimal control of the gas exchange were examined using approach by Hari et al. (Tree Phys. 2: 169–175, 1986). Biochemical model by Farquhar et al. (Planta 149: 78–90, 1980) was utilized to describe the photosynthetic production rate of needles. The model parameters were determined from field measurements. The results from the optimization approach and biochemical model were compared and their performance was found quite similar in terms of R2 calculated using measured exchange rates (0.89 for optimization model and 0.85 for biochemical model). Minor differences were found in relation to responses to intercellular carbon dioxide concentration and temperature.
  • Aalto, Finnish Meteorological Institute, Air Quality Research, Sahaajankatu 20 E, FIN-00810 Helsinki, Finland ORCID ID:E-mail: tuula.aalto@fmi.fi (email)
  • Hari, University of Helsinki, Dept. of Forest Ecology, P.O. Box 27, FIN-00014 University of Helsinki, Finland ORCID ID:E-mail:
  • Vesala, University of Helsinki, Dept. of Physics, P.O. Box 64, FIN-00014 University of Helsinki, Finland ORCID ID:E-mail:
article id 621, category Research article
Jyrki Kangas, Pekka Leskinen, Timo Pukkala. (2000). Integrating timber price scenario modeling with tactical management planning of private forestry at forest holding level. Silva Fennica vol. 34 no. 4 article id 621. https://doi.org/10.14214/sf.621
In forest management planning, deterministic timber prices are typically assumed. However, real-life timber prices vary in the course of time, and also price peaks, i.e. exceptionally high timber prices, might occur. If land-owners can utilise the price variation by selling timber with the high prices, they are able to increase their net revenues correspondingly. In this study, an approach is presented to study the timber price variation and its significance in the optimization of forest management. The approach utilizes stochastic timber price scenario modelling, simulation of forest development, and optimization of forest management. The approach is presented and illustrated by means of a case study. It is shown how the degree of uncertainty due to variation in timber prices can be analyzed in tactical forest planning of private forestry, and how the potential benefits of adaptive timber-selling behaviour for a forest landowner can be computed by using the approach. The effects of stochastic timber prices on the choice of forest plan are studied at the forest holding level considering also the spacing and type of cuttings and the optimal cutting order. A forest plan prepared under the assumption of constant timber price very seldom results in optimal forest management. Through studying the effects of stochastic timber prices, forest landowners and other decision makers obtain valuable information about the significance of adaptive timber selling behaviour. The presented methodology can also be used in analysing the land-owners’ economic risks as a function of time-price structure.
  • Kangas, Finnish Forest Research Institute, Kannus Research Station, P.O. Box 44, FIN-69101 Kannus, Finland ORCID ID:E-mail: jyrki.kangas@metla.fi (email)
  • Leskinen, Finnish Forest Research Institute, Kannus Research Station, P.O. Box 44, FIN-69101 Kannus, Finland ORCID ID:E-mail:
  • Pukkala, University of Joensuu, Faculty of Forestry, P.O. Box 111, FIN-80101 Joensuu, Finland ORCID ID:E-mail:
article id 644, category Research article
Jouni Pykäläinen. (2000). Defining forest owner’s forest-management goals by means of a thematic interview in interactive forest planning. Silva Fennica vol. 34 no. 1 article id 644. https://doi.org/10.14214/sf.644
Numerical optimization may not be the best way to launch an interactive planning process. The forest owner may not be able to identify precise management goals, as required in numerical optimization, for his forest. The owner may also think that it is impossible to express forest-management goals numerically. Due to these reasons, thematic interview was tested as an introductory method in interactive planning in several actual planning cases. It was observed that these interviews helped the owners in outlining their forest-management goals, and they offered an appropriate framework for defining these goals. It was also noticed that the goals defined in the course of the interviews could be included in the planning model in a way understood and accepted by the owners, and the goals defined could be fulfilled.
  • Pykäläinen, University of Joensuu, Faculty of Forestry, P.O. Box 111, FIN-80101 Joensuu, Finland ORCID ID:E-mail: jouni.pykalainen@joensuu.fi (email)

Category: Article

article id 5622, category Article
Christine Deleuze, François Houllier. (1997). A transport model for tree ring width. Silva Fennica vol. 31 no. 3 article id 5622. https://doi.org/10.14214/sf.a8523

Process-based tree growth models are recognized to be flexible tools which are valuable for investigating tree growth in relation to changing environment or silvicultural treatments. In the context of forestry, we address two key modelling problems: allocation of growth which determines total wood production, and distribution of wood along the stem which determines stem form and wood quality. Growth allocation and distribution are the outcome of carbon translocation, which may be described by the Munch theory. We propose a simpler gradient process to describe the carbon distribution in the phloem of conifers. This model is a reformulation of a carbon diffusion-like process proposed by Thornley in 1972. By taking into account the continuity of the cambium along the stem, we obtain a one-dimensional reaction-diffusion model which describes both growth allocation between foliage, stem and roots, and growth distribution along the stem. Distribution of wood along the stem is then regarded as an allocation process at a smaller scale. A preliminary sensitivity analysis is presented. The model predicts a strong relationship between morphology and foliage-root allocation. It also suggests how empirical data, such as stem analysis, could be used to calibrate and validate allocation rules in process-based growth models.

  • Deleuze, ORCID ID:E-mail:
  • Houllier, ORCID ID:E-mail:
article id 5484, category Article
Jyrki Kangas, Timo Pukkala. (1992). A decision theoretic approach applied to goal programming of forest management. Silva Fennica vol. 26 no. 3 article id 5484. https://doi.org/10.14214/sf.a15645

An alternative approach to formulating a forestry goal programming problem is presented. First, single objective optima levels are solved. The Analytical Hierarchy Process is applied in the estimation of a priori weights of deviations from the goal target levels. The ratios of the weights can be interpreted as relative importance of the goals, respectively. The sum of the weighted deviations from all single optima levels associated with the management goals is minimized. Instead of absolute deviations, relative ones are used. A case study problem of forest management planning with several objectives, measured in different units, is analysed.

The PDF includes an abstract in Finnish.

  • Kangas, ORCID ID:E-mail:
  • Pukkala, ORCID ID:E-mail:
article id 5419, category Article
Timo Pukkala, Owen Mubita, Jussi Saramäki. (1990). Management planning system for tree plantations. Silva Fennica vol. 24 no. 2 article id 5419. https://doi.org/10.14214/sf.a15573

The paper presents a simple model of long-term forest management planning in tree plantations. The model is particularly suitable for developing countries where the research resources are limited. The management plan is prepared in two steps. First, one or several treatment schedules are simulated for each calculation unit (age class, compartment, etc.) over the selected planning period. Second, an optimal combination treatment schedules according to the selected objectives and constraints is searched by mathematical programming. The simulation of growth is based on the prediction of the diameter distribution at the desired time point. All stand characteristics are derived from this distribution. The models needed in the yield simulation can be estimated from temporary sample plots. A case study management plan for 13,000 ha of Pinus kesiya (Royle ex Gordon) plantations in Zambia is presented to demonstrate the system.

The PDF includes an abstract in Finnish.

  • Pukkala, ORCID ID:E-mail:
  • Mubita, ORCID ID:E-mail:
  • Saramäki, ORCID ID:E-mail:
article id 5346, category Article
Timo Pukkala. (1988). Methods to incorporate the amenity of landscape into forest management planning. Silva Fennica vol. 22 no. 2 article id 5346. https://doi.org/10.14214/sf.a15503

The study presents methods that incorporate the amenity of a forest area into the management planning. The management plan is based on treatment schedules simulated for each compartment over the 20-year planning period. The best combination of treatment schedules is selected by multi-objective optimization. The amenity is divided into two parts: (1) within-stand amenity and (2) the amenity of landscape when viewed afar (distant scene). The within-stand amenity is expressed in terms of adjective sum which is estimated from stand characteristics. The adjective sum of the whole area in a selected year can be taken as an objective or constraining variable of optimization. The assessment of the distant scene is based on computer illustrations which show the predicted temporal change of landscape according to a particular management plan.

The PDF includes a summary in Finnish.

  • Pukkala, ORCID ID:E-mail:
article id 7513, category Article
Jyrki Kangas, Teppo Loikkanen, Timo Pukkala, Jouni Pykäläinen. (1996). A participatory approach to tactical forest planning. Acta Forestalia Fennica no. 251 article id 7513. https://doi.org/10.14214/aff.7513

The paper examines the needs, premises and criteria for effective public participation in tactical forest planning. A method for participatory forest planning utilizing the techniques of preference analysis, professional expertise and heuristic optimization is introduced. The techniques do not cover the whole process of participatory planning, but are applied as a tool constituting the numerical core for decision support. The complexity of multi-resource management is addressed by hierarchical decision analysis which assesses the public values, preferences and decision criteria toward the planning situation. An optimal management plan is sought using heuristic optimization. The plan can further be improved through mutual negotiations, if necessary. The use of the approach is demonstrated with an illustrative example. Its merits and challenges for participatory forest planning and decision making are discussed and a model for applying it in general forest planning context is depicted. By using the approach, valuable information can be obtained about public preferences and the effects of taking them into consideration on the choice of the combination of standwise treatment proposals for a forest area. Participatory forest planning calculations, carried out by the approach presented in the paper, can be utilized in conflict management and in developing compromises between competing interests.

  • Kangas, ORCID ID:E-mail:
  • Loikkanen, ORCID ID:E-mail:
  • Pukkala, ORCID ID:E-mail:
  • Pykäläinen, ORCID ID:E-mail:
article id 7678, category Article
Lauri. Valsta. (1992). An optimization model for Norway spruce management based on individual-tree growth models. Acta Forestalia Fennica no. 232 article id 7678. https://doi.org/10.14214/aff.7678

A nonlinear programming algorithm was combined with two individual-tree growth simulators consisting of distance-independent diameter and height growth models and mortality models. Management questions that can be addressed by the optimization model include the timing, intensity and type of thinning, rotation age, and initial density. The results were calculated for Norway spruce (Picea abies (L.) H. Karst.) stands on Oxalis-Myrtillus site in Southern Finland, where the stand density after clearing of a seedling stand is about 2,000 trees/ha.

The optimum thinning programs were characterized by late first thinnings (at dominant height of 15–17 m) and relatively high growing stock levels. It was optimal to thin from above, unless mean annual increment was maximized instead of an economic objective. In most cases, the optimum number of thinnings was two or three. Compared to a no-thinning alternative, thinnings increased revenues by 15 –45% depending on the objective of stand management. Optimum rotation was strongly dependent on the interest rate.

Hooke and Jeeves’ direct search method was used for determining optimum solutions. The performance of the optimization algorithm was examined in terms of the number of functional evaluations and the equivalence of the objective function values of repeated optimizations.

The PDF includes a summary in Finnish.

  • Valsta, ORCID ID:E-mail:

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