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Silva Fennica 1926-1997
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Articles containing the keyword 'simulator'.

Category: Research article

article id 1302, category Research article
Nils Fahlvik, Per Magnus Ekö, Nils Petersson. (2015). Effects of precommercial thinning strategies on stand structure and growth in a mixed even-aged stand of Scots pine, Norway spruce and birch in southern Sweden. Silva Fennica vol. 49 no. 3 article id 1302. https://doi.org/10.14214/sf.1302
Highlights: Precommercial thinning (PCT) was a useful tool to influence the stand structure in accordance to silvicultural goals; PCT had a great impact on tree species composition; The seemingly great potential to influence the structure of a heterogeneous, mixed stand was restrained by natural settings and unconditional considerations at PCT (e.g. tree vitality, stem quality, regular spacing).
Four different management strategies were applied to a young mixed stand of Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris L.), Norway spruce (Pices abies (L.) Karst.) and birch (Betula pendula Roth and Betula pubescens Ehrh.) in southern Sweden. All strategies included an initial precommercial thinning to ca. 2400 stems ha–1. The different aims were: (i) a conifer-dominated stand with focus on high productivity; (ii) a conifer-dominated stand with high quality timber; (iii) keeping a stem-wise species mixture; (iv) a mosaic-wise species mixture. Stem selection according to the different strategies were simulated with a starting point from plots with a 5 m radius. All strategies were applied to all of the plots. A growth simulator was used to simulate the stand development up to final felling. This study illustrates the possibilities for influencing the structure of a mixed stand through precommercial thinning. The study also illustrates the long-term effects on stand structure and volume yield by consequently applying a management strategy from precommercial thinning until final felling. Precommercial thinning was found to be a useful tool to influence the stand structure in accordance to the aims set. However, the opportunities for influencing the stand by precommercial thinning were restricted by natural settings and unconditional considerations (e.g. tree vitality, stem quality, regular spacing), beyond what could be judged from stand average data. The stem volume production during a rotation was 6% lower for (iii) and (iv) compared to (i) and (ii), mainly due to a greater proportion of birch in the former strategies.
  • Fahlvik, Southern Swedish Forest Research Centre, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, P.O. Box 49, SE-230 53 Alnarp, Sweden ORCID ID:E-mail: nils.fahlvik@slu.se (email)
  • Ekö, Southern Swedish Forest Research Centre, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, P.O. Box 49, SE-230 53 Alnarp, Sweden ORCID ID:E-mail: per.magnus.eko@slu.se
  • Petersson, StoraEnso Skog AB, Åsgatan 22, SE-791 80 Falun, Sweden ORCID ID:E-mail: nils.petersson@storaenso.com
article id 906, category Research article
Eivind Meen, Anders Nielsen, Mikael Ohlson. (2012). Forest stand modelling as a tool to predict performance of the understory herb Cornus suecica. Silva Fennica vol. 46 no. 4 article id 906. https://doi.org/10.14214/sf.906
Forest simulation models have been widely used to predict future stand structure. Generally these models do not include the understory vegetation and its response on stand structure change or other environmental factors. Previous simulation studies have shown that stand structure related variables, e.g. basal area, can explain diversity of the forest floor vegetation in boreal forests. We hypothesise that such variables also can be used to explain the performance of understory species and we conceptualise how plant ecology and forest modelling can be combined to predict the performance of understory plants in Norwegian boreal forests. We predict the performance of an understory plant species (Cornus suecica) over time using simulated values of forest variables as input to models expressing the relationship between forest environment variables and plant performance variables (viz. plant height, plant dry weight, number of flowers, number of branches and number of leaves). We also present relationships between plant performance and explanatory variables commonly used in basic ecological research, variables that currently not are readily compatible with forest simulators (e.g. soil chemical variables).We found basal area of canopy trees being the most important explanatory variable explaining C. suecica performance. The performance variable dry weight was predicted by one single model whereas the other performance variables were best predicted by model averaging. Forest simulations for 150 years showed values of plant performance of C. suecica to be reduced during forest succession.
  • Meen, Norwegian University of Life Sciences, Department of Ecology and Natural Resource Management, P.O. Box 5003, NO-1432 Ås, Norway ORCID ID:E-mail: eivind.meen@umb.no (email)
  • Nielsen, Norwegian University of Life Sciences, Department of Ecology and Natural Resource Management, P.O. Box 5003, NO-1432 Ås, Norway ORCID ID:E-mail:
  • Ohlson, Norwegian University of Life Sciences, Department of Ecology and Natural Resource Management, P.O. Box 5003, NO-1432 Ås, Norway ORCID ID:E-mail:
article id 197, category Research article
Veli-Pekka Ikonen, Seppo Kellomäki, Heli Peltola. (2009). Sawn timber properties of Scots pine as affected by initial stand density, thinning and pruning: a simulation based approach. Silva Fennica vol. 43 no. 3 article id 197. https://doi.org/10.14214/sf.197
The aim of this work was to analyze how different management schedules with varying initial stand density, thinning and artificial pruning of branches affect the quality, quantity and value of sawing yield in Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris L.). For this purpose, an integrated model system was employed and further developed to simulate: i) the three dimensional structure of the crown and stem of an average tree grown in a stand related to the changes in the within-stand light conditions as caused by the stand management, and ii) the sawing of logs into pieces and their quality grading based on the size and number of living and dead knots on the surfaces of sawn pieces. To maximize the quality of sawn timber, relatively dense stand is desired in the early phase of the rotation to reduce, especially in the lower part of stem, the growth of branches, and to increase the rate of dying and pruning-off of branches. In the later phase, a relatively sparse stand is desired to increase the self-pruning of branches and the occlusion of knots. However, in any case, artificial pruning is needed to maximize the knot-free zone of the stem. Also the value optimization of individual sawn pieces affects the quality and value of sawn timber. Because, only average tree was simulated, the differences between scenarios for stem volume were small. In the future, further model development is needed to analyze the development of crown and stem properties of trees with different status in a stand.
  • Ikonen, University of Joensuu, Faculty of Forest Sciences, P.O. Box 111, FI-80101 Joensuu, Finland ORCID ID:E-mail: veli-pekka.ikonen@joensuu.fi (email)
  • Kellomäki, University of Joensuu, Faculty of Forest Sciences, P.O. Box 111, FI-80101 Joensuu, Finland ORCID ID:E-mail:
  • Peltola, University of Joensuu, Faculty of Forest Sciences, P.O. Box 111, FI-80101 Joensuu, Finland ORCID ID:E-mail:
article id 220, category Research article
Jani Heikkilä, Matti Sirén, Anssi Ahtikoski, Jari Hynynen, Tiina Sauvula, Mika Lehtonen. (2009). Energy wood thinning as a part of stand management of Scots pine and Norway spruce. Silva Fennica vol. 43 no. 1 article id 220. https://doi.org/10.14214/sf.220
The effects of combined production of industrial and energy wood on yield and harvesting incomes, as well as the feasibility of energy wood procurement, were studied. Data for 22 Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris L.) and 21 Norway spruce (Picea abies (L.) Karst.) juvenile stands in Central and Southern Finland were used to compare six combined production regimes to conventional industrial wood production. The study was based on simulations made by the MOTTI stand simulator, which produces growth predictions for alternative management regimes under various site and climatic conditions. The combined production regimes included precommercial thinning at 4–8 m dominant height to a density of 3000–4000 stems ha–1 and energy wood harvesting at 8, 10 or 12 m dominant height. Combined production did not decrease the total yield of industrial wood during the rotation period. Differences in the mean annual increment (MAI) were small, and the rotation periods varied only slightly between the alternatives. Combined production regime can be feasible for a forest owner if the price of energy wood is 3–5 EUR m–3 in pine stands, and 8–9 EUR m–3 in spruce stands. Energy wood procurement was not economically viable at the current energy price (12 EUR MWh–1) without state subsidies. Without subsidies a 15 EUR MWh–1 energy price would be needed. Our results imply that the combined production of industrial and energy wood could be a feasible stand management alternative.
  • Heikkilä, L&T Biowatti Oy, P.O. Box 738, FI-60101 Seinäjoki, Finland ORCID ID:E-mail: jani.heikkila@biowatti.fi (email)
  • Sirén, Finnish Forest Research Institute, Vantaa Research Unit, P.O.Box 18, FI-01301 Vantaa, Finland ORCID ID:E-mail:
  • Ahtikoski, Finnish Forest Research Institute, Rovaniemi Research Unit, P.O.Box 16, FI-96301 Rovaniemi, Finland ORCID ID:E-mail:
  • Hynynen, Finnish Forest Research Institute, Vantaa Research Unit, P.O.Box 18, FI-01301 Vantaa, Finland ORCID ID:E-mail:
  • Sauvula, Seinäjoki University of Applied Sciences, School of Agriculture and Forestry, Tuomarniementie 55, FI-63700 Ähtäri, Finland ORCID ID:E-mail:
  • Lehtonen, Finnish Forest Research Institute, Vantaa Research Unit, P.O.Box 18, FI-01301 Vantaa, Finland ORCID ID:E-mail:
article id 376, category Research article
Nils Lexerød, Trond Eid. (2005). Recruitment models for Norway spruce, Scots pine, birch and other broadleaves in young growth forests in Norway. Silva Fennica vol. 39 no. 3 article id 376. https://doi.org/10.14214/sf.376
The objective of the present study was to develop recruitment models for Norway spruce, Scots pine, birch and other broadleaves in young growth forests in Norway. The models were developed from permanent sample plots established by the National Forest Inventory, and they will be included in a growth simulator that is part of a large-scale forestry scenario model. The modelling was therefore restricted to independent variables directly or indirectly available from inventories for practical forest management planning. A two-stage modelling approach that suited the stochastic nature of recruitment in boreal forests was used. Models predicting the probability of recruitment were estimated in a first stage, and conditional models for the number of recruits were developed in a second. The probability models as well as the conditional models were biologically realistic and logical. The goodness of fit tests revealed that the probability models fitted the data well, while the coefficients of determination for the conditional models were relatively low. No independent test data were available, but comparisons of predicted and observed number of recruits in different sub-groups of the data revealed few large deviations. The high level of large random errors was probably due to the great variability observed in number of recruits rather than inappropriate specifications of the models. Provided the generally high level of uncertainty connected to analysis performed with large-scale forestry scenario models and the stochastic nature of recruitment, the presented models seem to give satisfactory levels of accuracy.
  • Lexerød, Norwegian University of Life Sciences, Department of Ecology and Natural Resource Management, P.O. Box 5003, NO-1432 Ås, Norway ORCID ID:E-mail: nils.lexerod@umb.no (email)
  • Eid, Norwegian University of Life Sciences, Department of Ecology and Natural Resource Management, P.O. Box 5003, NO-1432 Ås, Norway. E-mail nils.lexerod@umb.no ORCID ID:E-mail:
article id 398, category Research article
Heikki Ovaskainen. (2005). Comparison of harvester work in forest and simulator environments. Silva Fennica vol. 39 no. 1 article id 398. https://doi.org/10.14214/sf.398
Harvester simulators offer a safe and cost-saving method for studying the basics of harvester controls and working technique. Therefore, harvester simulators are increasingly being used in the education of harvester operators. In this study, the objective was to compare harvester work in real and simulator environments, and to determine how a professional harvester operator’s working technique may have changed in the simulator environment. Specific features of the simulator that encumbered operators’ normal work are also presented; and the correspondence of the simulator to reality is evaluated. The work of six professional harvester operators was studied in thinning and in clear cutting stands in both environments: first in the real forest and thereafter on the simulator. The results indicate that the operators’ working technique on the simulator was mainly the same as in the real forest. This means that the same restrictions are valid on the simulator as in the forest. The basic principles of harvesting must be known so that high productivity and good quality can be obtained. However, certain simulator-specific features encumbered the work of harvester operators. Limited visibility to the side increased the need to reverse and the 3D-visualization caused failed catches. Improvements in software would remove some of the defects, e.g. failed felling and cheating in the felling phase. These results also indicate that simulators can be used for research purposes.
  • Ovaskainen, University of Joensuu, Faculty of Forestry, P.O. Box 111, FI-80101 Joensuu, Finland ORCID ID:E-mail: heikki.ovaskainen@joensuu.fi (email)

Category: Article

article id 5179, category Article
Pertti Harstela, Antti Maukkonen. (1983). Tavanomainen ja kuormainprosessori varttuneissa harvennusmetsiköissä. Silva Fennica vol. 17 no. 2 article id 5179. https://doi.org/10.14214/sf.a15095
English title: A conventional and grapple loader processor in second and third thinnings. A simulator experiment.

Using literature and a simulator experiment, an ordinary processor and a grapple loader processor were compared in conditions corresponding to thinning later than the first commercial thinning. Visual bucking only was employed in the simulator experiment. The strip road spacing was 30 m and there was no preliminary skidding of the trees. The simulator experiment confirmed the view reached in the literature that work productivity of the grappler loader processor is 20–40 % greater than that of an ordinary processor provided that the stem size is under 0.2–0.4 m3.

The PDF includes a summary in English.

  • Harstela, ORCID ID:E-mail:
  • Maukkonen, ORCID ID:E-mail:
article id 7678, category Article
Lauri. Valsta. (1992). An optimization model for Norway spruce management based on individual-tree growth models. Acta Forestalia Fennica no. 232 article id 7678. https://doi.org/10.14214/aff.7678

A nonlinear programming algorithm was combined with two individual-tree growth simulators consisting of distance-independent diameter and height growth models and mortality models. Management questions that can be addressed by the optimization model include the timing, intensity and type of thinning, rotation age, and initial density. The results were calculated for Norway spruce (Picea abies (L.) H. Karst.) stands on Oxalis-Myrtillus site in Southern Finland, where the stand density after clearing of a seedling stand is about 2,000 trees/ha.

The optimum thinning programs were characterized by late first thinnings (at dominant height of 15–17 m) and relatively high growing stock levels. It was optimal to thin from above, unless mean annual increment was maximized instead of an economic objective. In most cases, the optimum number of thinnings was two or three. Compared to a no-thinning alternative, thinnings increased revenues by 15 –45% depending on the objective of stand management. Optimum rotation was strongly dependent on the interest rate.

Hooke and Jeeves’ direct search method was used for determining optimum solutions. The performance of the optimization algorithm was examined in terms of the number of functional evaluations and the equivalence of the objective function values of repeated optimizations.

The PDF includes a summary in Finnish.

  • Valsta, ORCID ID:E-mail:

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