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Articles containing the keyword 'species richness'.

Category: Research article

article id 10001, category Research article
Karoliina Hämäläinen, Teemu Tahvanainen, Kaisa Junninen. (2018). Characteristics of boreal and hemiboreal herb-rich forests as habitats for polypore fungi. Silva Fennica vol. 52 no. 5 article id 10001. https://doi.org/10.14214/sf.10001
Highlights: Polypore species richness and diversity were affected positively by dead-wood diversity, and negatively by increasing latitude; Red-listed species responded only to the abundance of large-diameter dead wood; Main factor determining composition of polypore assemblages was host-tree species; High proportion of deciduous dead-wood in herb-rich forests provides complementary effect on polypore assemblages in boreal forest landscapes.

Herb-rich forests are often considered biodiversity hotspots in the boreal zone but their fungal assemblages, particularly those of wood-decaying fungi, remain poorly known. We studied herb-rich forests as habitats for polypores, a distinct group of wood-decaying fungi, and assessed the importance of tree- and stand-scale variables for polypore species richness, abundance, and diversity, including red-listed species. The data include 71 herb-rich forest stands in Finland and 4797 dead wood items, on which we made 2832 observations of 101 polypore species. Dead-wood diversity was the most important variable explaining polypore species richness and diversity, whereas increasing latitude had a negative effect. Red-listed species showed a positive response to the abundance of large-diameter dead wood, which, especially birch, supported also high general abundance of polypores. The composition of polypore assemblages reflected their host-tree species. The red-listed species did not show explicit patterns in the ordination space. Compared to old-growth spruce forests, herb-rich forests seem to host lower polypore species richness and less red-listed species. However, because of high proportion of deciduous trees in the dead wood profile, herb-rich forests have a clear complementary effect on polypore assemblages in boreal forest landscapes.

  • Hämäläinen, School of Forest Sciences, University of Eastern Finland, P.O. Box 111, FI-80101 Joensuu, Finland ORCID ID:E-mail: karoham@uef.fi (email)
  • Tahvanainen, Department of Environmental and Biological Sciences, University of Eastern Finland, P.O. Box 111, FI-80101 Joensuu, Finland ORCID ID:E-mail: teemu.tahvanainen@uef.fi
  • Junninen, Metsähallitus Parks & Wildlife Finland, c/o UEF/Borealis, P.O. Box 111, FI-80101 Joensuu, Finland ORCID ID:E-mail: kaisa.junninen@metsa.fi
article id 907, category Research article
Chunyu Zhang, Yazhou Zhao, Xiuhai Zhao, Klaus von Gadow. (2012). Species-habitat associations in a northern temperate forest in China. Silva Fennica vol. 46 no. 4 article id 907. https://doi.org/10.14214/sf.907
This contribution identifies species-habitat associations in a temperate forest in north-eastern China, based on the assumption that habitats are spatially autocorrelated and species are spatially aggregated due to limited seed dispersal. The empirical observations were obtained in a large permanent experimental area covering 660 x 320 m. The experimental area was subdivided into four habitat types using multivariate regression tree (MRT) analysis. According to an indicator species analysis, 38 of the 47 studied species were found to be significant indicators of the MRT habitat types. The relationships between species richness and topographic variables were found to be scale-dependent, while the great majority of the species shows distinct habitat-dependence. There are 188 potential species-habitat associations, and 114 of these were significantly positive or negative based on habitat randomization. We identified 139 significant associations using a species randomization. A habitat is not a closed system it may be both, either a sink or a source. Therefore, additional to the randomization, the Poisson Cluster Model (PCM) was applied. PCM considers the spatial autocorrelation of species and habitats, and thus appears to be more realistic than the traditional randomization processes. It identified only 37 associations that were significant. In conclusion, the deviation from the random process, i.e. the high degree of species spatial mingling may be explained by persistent immigration across habitats.
  • Zhang, Key Laboratory for Forest Resources & Ecosystem Processes of Beijing, Beijing Forestry University, Beijing 100083, China ORCID ID:E-mail: zcy_0520@163.com (email)
  • Zhao, Department of Landscape Architecture, School of Architecture, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084, China ORCID ID:E-mail:
  • Zhao, Key Laboratory for Forest Resources & Ecosystem Processes of Beijing, Beijing Forestry University, Beijing 100083, China ORCID ID:E-mail:
  • von Gadow, Faculty of Forestry and Forest Ecology, Georg-August-University Göttingen, Büsgenweg 5, D-37077 Göttingen, Germany ORCID ID:E-mail: KGadow@gwdg.de
article id 65, category Research article
Kristóf Kelemen, Barbara Mihók, László Gálhidy, Tibor Standovár. (2012). Dynamic response of herbaceous vegetation to gap opening in a Central European beech stand. Silva Fennica vol. 46 no. 1 article id 65. https://doi.org/10.14214/sf.65
Herbaceous ground vegetation in artificially-created gaps was studied in a managed beech (Fagus sylvatica L.) forest over a period of eight years in Northern Hungary, Central Europe. These gaps were being used as an alternative to the regular shelterwood system to create uneven-aged stands. The effects of gap size (15 and 40 m diameter) and canopy openness on herbaceous species colonization and persistence were assessed in a systematic grid of 5 5 m. Overall, herbaceous cover was low before gap creation, increased soon afterwards, and continued to rise over time. The number of herb species increased in the gaps and, to a lesser extent, in adjacent areas under the remaining tree canopy. Colonization of gaps was rapid and there was substantial turnover of species i.e. various species disappeared from the gaps over time whilst others colonized. Species with both long-term persistent seed banks and long distance dispersal abilities were the most successful types colonizing gaps. Six species occurred preferentially in large gaps, while only one species was found to prefer small gaps. Species present before gap creation survived in both gap sizes. Smaller gaps with a diameter of half the height of canopy trees also tended to remain free of common weed species, whereas large cover of Rubus fruticosus L. and Calamagrostis epigejos (L.) Roth could hamper natural regeneration in larger gaps. For the successful regeneration of beech we recommend the use of small gaps complemented by few large gaps.
  • Kelemen, Loránd Eötvös University, Institute of Biology, Department of Plant Systematics, Ecology and Theoretical Biology, Budapest, Hungary ORCID ID:E-mail:
  • Mihók, Loránd Eötvös University, Institute of Biology, Department of Plant Systematics, Ecology and Theoretical Biology, Budapest, Hungary ORCID ID:E-mail:
  • Gálhidy, Loránd Eötvös University, Institute of Biology, Department of Plant Systematics, Ecology and Theoretical Biology, Budapest, Hungary ORCID ID:E-mail:
  • Standovár, Institute of Biology, Department of Plant Systematics, Ecology and Theoretical Biology, Budapest, Hungary ORCID ID:E-mail: standy@ludens.elte.hu (email)
article id 83, category Research article
Inari Ylläsjärvi, Håkan Berglund, Timo Kuuluvainen. (2011). Relationships between wood-inhabiting fungal species richness and habitat variables in old-growth forest stands in the Pallas-Yllästunturi National Park, northern boreal Finland. Silva Fennica vol. 45 no. 5 article id 83. https://doi.org/10.14214/sf.83
Indicators for biodiversity are needed for efficient prioritization of forests selected for conservation. We analyzed the relationships between 86 wood-inhabiting fungal (polypore) species richness and 35 habitat variables in 81 northern boreal old-growth forest stands in Finland. Species richness and the number of red-listed species were analyzed separately using generalized linear models. Most species were infrequent in the studied landscape and no species was encountered in all stands. The species richness increased with 1) the volume of coarse woody debris (CWD), 2) the mean DBH of CWD and 3) the basal area of living trees. The number of red-listed species increased along the same gradients, but the effect of basal area was not significant. Polypore species richness was significantly lower on western slopes than on flat topography. On average, species richness was higher on northern and eastern slopes than on western and southern slopes. The results suggest that a combination of habitat variables used as indicators may be useful in selecting forest stands to be set aside for polypore species conservation.
  • Ylläsjärvi, Rovaniemi University of Applied Sciences, School of Forestry and Rural Industries, Jokiväylä 11 c, FI-96300 Rovaniemi, Finland ORCID ID:E-mail: inari.yllasjarvi@ramk.fi (email)
  • Berglund, University of Helsinki, Department of Forest Sciences, Helsinki, Finland ORCID ID:E-mail:
  • Kuuluvainen, University of Helsinki, Department of Forest Sciences, Helsinki, Finland ORCID ID:E-mail:
article id 541, category Research article
Azim U. Mallik, F. Wayne Bell, Yanli Gong. (2002). Effectiveness of delayed brush cutting and herbicide treatments for vegetation control in a seven-year-old jack pine plantation in northwestern Ontario, Canada. Silva Fennica vol. 36 no. 2 article id 541. https://doi.org/10.14214/sf.541
Efficacy of three conifer release treatments, i) single application of glyphosate (Vision™) herbicide, ii) multiple application of glyphosate herbicide, and iii) motor-manual brush cutting for controlling competing plants, particularly trembling aspen (Populus tremuloides), pin cherry (Prunus pensylvanica), green alder (Alnus viridis spp. crispa), and beaked hazel (Corylus cornuta spp. cornuta), was studied in a seven-year-old jack pine (Pinus banksiana) plantation in northwestern Ontario, Canada. The single and multiple glyphosate applications were equally effective in controlling trembling aspen and pin cherry, causing over 90% stem mortality. The brushsaw treatment caused an initial decrease followed by an increase in stem density of these two species. A high degree of stem thinning by natural mortality in the untreated control plots was observed in trembling aspen (23–46%) and pin cherry (41–69%) over four years. As with trembling aspen and pin cherry, stem density of green alder and beaked hazel initially decreased and then increased following the brushsaw treatment, mainly due to resprouting. Stem mortality in green alder and beaked hazel was 45% and 97%, respectively, two years after the operational glyphosate treatment. Competition index (CI) was low (mean CI = 52, ranging from 18 to 115) in all the plots including the untreated control. There was a significant increase in basal diameter of jack pine in the brushsaw and herbicide-treated plots compared to the control three years after the treatments. Jack pine seedlings in the brushsaw and glyphosate treated plots were taller compared to that of control but differences were not significant. Lower species richness and diversity were recorded in the herbicide-treated plots compared to the brushsaw and control plots in the third growing season following treatment.
  • Mallik, Department of Biology, Lakehead University, Thunder Bay, Ontario, Canada P7B 5E1 ORCID ID:E-mail: azim.mallik@lakeheadu.ca (email)
  • Bell, Ontario Forest Research Institute, Ontario Ministry of Natural Resources, Sault Ste. Marie, Ontario, Canada P6A 2E5 ORCID ID:E-mail:
  • Gong, Department of Biology, Lakehead University, Thunder Bay, Ontario, Canada P7B 5E1 ORCID ID:E-mail:

Category: Article

article id 5209, category Article
Jussi Kuusipalo. (1984). Diversity pattern of the forest vegetation in relation to some site characteristics. Silva Fennica vol. 18 no. 2 article id 5209. https://doi.org/10.14214/sf.a15388

A field data set representing boreal forest-floor vegetation in Southern Finland was analysed using a simultaneous equation model. Some physical and chemical characteristics of the soil and some structural characteristics of the tree stand were treated as predictors in such a way that the tree stand factor was specified to be dependent on the soil variables. Alpha diversity, measured as the total number of species per plot, was treated as a criterion variable.

The model explains 60% of variance in the alpha diversity indicating markedly strong relationships with the site characteristics. Alpha diversity appears to increase with increases in site fertility characteristics. On the other hand, measured characteristics of the tree stand indicate no significant independent effects on the alpha diversity.

The PDF includes a summary in Finnish.

  • Kuusipalo, ORCID ID:E-mail:

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