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Articles containing the keyword 'speed'.

Category: Research article

article id 441, category Research article
Ane Zubizarreta-Gerendiain, Petri Pellikka, Jordi Garcia-Gonzalo, Veli-Pekka Ikonen, Heli Peltola. (2012). Factors affecting wind and snow damage of individual trees in a small management unit in Finland: assessment based on inventoried damage and mechanistic modelling. Silva Fennica vol. 46 no. 2 article id 441. https://doi.org/10.14214/sf.441
In this work, we assessed the factors affecting wind and snow damage of individual trees in a small management unit in western Finland. This was done based on inventoried damage and observed wind speeds and snow loading in storms Pyry and Janika in 2001 and Mielikki in 2002 together with mechanistic model. First, we studied which factors explain the observed damage in individual trees. Secondly, we studied how well the mechanistic model (HWIND) could predict the wind speed needed to uproot individual trees at the margins of permanent upwind edges. We found that Pyry storm caused 70% and Janika and Mielikki 18 and 12% of observed damage. In Janika storm, all trees uprooted. In other storms, both uprooting and stem breakage occurred. Scots pine suffered the most damage. Recently thinned stands on the upwind edges of open areas suffered the most damage. But, damage occurred also on soils with relatively shallow anchorage. HWIND predicted correctly damage for 69% of all uprooted trees. No-uprooting was correctly predicted for 45 and 19% of standing trees (all Scots pines), which were measured within and at the immediate upwind edge of same stands. HWIND model needs further validation at the permanent edges and/or on soils with shallow rooting to improve its prediction accuracy in such conditions.
  • Zubizarreta-Gerendiain, Technical University of Lisbon, School of Agriculture, Forest Research Centre, Lisbon, Portugal ORCID ID:E-mail:
  • Pellikka, University of Helsinki, Dept. of Geosciences and Geography, Helsinki, Finland ORCID ID:E-mail:
  • Garcia-Gonzalo, Technical University of Lisbon, School of Agriculture, Forest Research Centre, Lisbon, Portugal ORCID ID:E-mail:
  • Ikonen, University of Eastern Finland, School of Forest Sciences, Joensuu, Finland ORCID ID:E-mail:
  • Peltola, University of Eastern Finland, School of Forest Sciences, Joensuu, Finland ORCID ID:E-mail: heli.peltola@uef.fi (email)
article id 212, category Research article
Sandhya Samarasinghe. (2009). Exploration of fracture dynamics properties and predicting fracture toughness of individual wood beams using neural networks. Silva Fennica vol. 43 no. 2 article id 212. https://doi.org/10.14214/sf.212
In this study, the time to crack initiation (Tinit), duration of crack propagation (Tfrac), crack initiation stress, peak stress as well as crack speed and fracture toughness were investigated for three Rates of Loading (ROL) and four sizes of notched wood beams using high-speed video imaging and neural networks. Tinit was consistent for all volumes and the average Tinit was nonlinearly related to volume and ROL. For the smallest ROL, there was a distinct volume effect on Tinit and the effect was negligble at the largest ROL. However, the stress at crack initiation was not consistent. Contrasting these, Tfrac for all volumes appeared to be highly variable but the peak stress carried prior to catastrophic failure was consistent. The crack propagation was a wave phenomenon with positive and negative (crack closure) speeds that varied with the ROL. As accurate estimation of crack initiation load (or stress) and its relationship to peak load (or stress) is important for determining fracture toughness, Artificial Neural Networks (ANN) models were developed for predicting them from volume, Young’s modulus, face and grain angles, density, moisture content and ROL. Models for crack initiation load and peak load showed much higher predictive power than those for the stresses with correlation coefficients of 0.85 and 0.97, respectively, between the actual and predicted loads. Neural networks were also developed for predicting fracture toughness of individual wood specimens and the best model produced a statistically significant correlation of 0.813 between the predicted and actual fracture toughness on a validation dataset. The inputs captured 62% of variability of fracture toughness. Volume and Young’s modulus were the top two contributing variables with others providing lesser contributions.
  • Samarasinghe, Centre for Advanced Computational Solutions (C-fACS), Lincoln University, Canterbury, New Zealand ORCID ID:E-mail: sandhya.samarasinghe@lincoln.ac.nz (email)
article id 302, category Research article
Gökay Nemli, Turgay Akbulut, Emir Zekoviç. (2007). Effects of some sanding factors on the surface roughness of particleboard. Silva Fennica vol. 41 no. 2 article id 302. https://doi.org/10.14214/sf.302
Effects of the grit sizes of the sand belt, feeding speed and the feed power of the heads of the sander on the surface roughness of the particleboard panels were investigated. Two surface roughness parameters, average roughness (Ra) and mean peak-to-valley height (Rz), obtained from board surfaces were used in the analysis. Sanding factors were found to have a significant effect on the surface roughness of the particleboard. Better results were obtained with 40 m/min of feeding speed, 40-60-80-120 of grit sizes, and 67 kW of the feed power of the heads of the sander.
  • Nemli, Karadeniz Technical University, Faculty of Forestry, Trabzon-Türkiye ORCID ID:E-mail: nemli@ktu.edu.tr (email)
  • Akbulut, Istanbul University, Faculty of Forestry, Istanbul-Türkiye ORCID ID:E-mail:
  • Zekoviç, Starwood Forest Product Company, Production Manager, Bursa-Türkiye ORCID ID:E-mail:
article id 501, category Research article
Jiaojun Zhu, Yutaka Gonda, Takeshi Matsuzaki, Masashi Yamamoto. (2003). Modeling relative wind speed by optical stratification porosity within the canopy of a coastal protective forest at different stem densities. Silva Fennica vol. 37 no. 2 article id 501. https://doi.org/10.14214/sf.501
Wind speed and optical stratification porosity (OSP) were measured at various heights inside a coastal protective forest thinned to different stem densities to assess whether any characteristics of the wind profile in the coastal protective forest could be predicted from OSP. OSP was defined as vertical distribution of the proportion of sky hemisphere not obscured by tree elements inside a forest stand, and was determined for various heights using hemispherical photographic silhouettes on a computer processing system. The distribution of OSP in the coastal forest follows the Lambert-Beer’s law with an extinction coefficient (v). The relative wind speed within the canopy can be described using an exponential form with an attenuation coefficient (a). Variation in relative wind speed was very closely correlated with the distribution of OSP within the canopy. While below the canopy, i.e., in the trunk space, relative wind speed was little correlated with the distribution of OSP because the distribution of OSP was relatively constant there. Therefore, the linear relationships between relative wind speed and OSP and between the two coefficients v and a were established within the canopy. The results suggest that OSP can be used to predict the wind profile in case of the application within the canopy of the coastal forest.
  • Zhu, Qingyuan Station of Forest Ecology, Institute of Applied Ecology, the Chinese Academy of Sciences, No. 72 Wenhua Road, Shenyang 110016, P.R. China; Faculty of Agriculture, Niigata University, Niigata 950-2181, Japan ORCID ID:E-mail: jiaojunzhu@iae.ac.cn (email)
  • Gonda, Faculty of Agriculture, Niigata University, Niigata 950-2181, Japan ORCID ID:E-mail:
  • Matsuzaki, Faculty of Agriculture, Niigata University, Niigata 950-2181, Japan ORCID ID:E-mail:
  • Yamamoto, Faculty of Agriculture, Niigata University, Niigata 950-2181, Japan ORCID ID:E-mail:

Category: Article

article id 5505, category Article
Heli Peltola, Jorma Aho, Alpo Hassinen, Seppo Kellomäki, Matti Lemettinen. (1993). Swaying of trees as caused by wind: analysis of field measurements. Silva Fennica vol. 27 no. 2 article id 5505. https://doi.org/10.14214/sf.a15666

Measurements of wind and subsequent swaying of two Scots pines (Pinus sylvestris L.) were made at stand edge conditions. The horizontal windspeed was measured ten meters outside of the stand edge for four heights using cup anemometers. The compass directions were determined using a directional vane placed above the canopy. Tree swaying was measured by accelerometers at xy-coordinates. The shape of the wind profile at the stand edge varied to some degree depending on windspeed, but the form was a logarithmic one. Swaying of trees increased along with increasing windspeed. Furthermore, swaying was more or less irregular in relation to xy-coordinates, but it occurred, however, mainly perpendicularly to the direction of mean windspeed. The maximum bending of trees to the direction of mean windspeed varied also only little for various gusting windspeeds (average windspeed of 20 seconds) and dynamic wind loads. The maximum bending of trees was also in most cases less or equal to those predicted on the basis of static wind loads, when the mean windspeed for static load is taken as equal to the gusting windspeed.

The PDF includes an abstract in Finnish.

  • Peltola, ORCID ID:E-mail:
  • Aho, ORCID ID:E-mail:
  • Hassinen, ORCID ID:E-mail:
  • Kellomäki, ORCID ID:E-mail:
  • Lemettinen, ORCID ID:E-mail:
article id 5504, category Article
Heli Peltola, Seppo Kellomäki. (1993). A mechanistic model for calculating windthrow and stem breakage of Scots pines at stand age. Silva Fennica vol. 27 no. 2 article id 5504. https://doi.org/10.14214/sf.a15665

A model for the mechanism of windfall and stem breakage was constructed for single Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris L.) at the stand edge. The total turning moment arising from the wind drag and from the bending of stem and crown was calculated along with the breaking stress of the stem. Similarly, the support given by the root -soil plate anchorage was calculated. Windspeed variation within the crown and the vertical distribution of stem and crown weight were taken into account. Model computations showed that trees having a large height to diameter ratio were subjected to greater risk of falling down or breaking than trees with a small height to diameter ratio. The windspeed required to blow down a tree or break the stem of a tree decreased if the height to diameter ratio or the crown to stem ratio of trees increased.
The PDF includes an abstract in Finnish.

  • Peltola, ORCID ID:E-mail:
  • Kellomäki, ORCID ID:E-mail:

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