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Diego Pérez (email), Markku Kanninen

Effect of thinning on stem form and wood characteristics of teak (Tectona grandis) in a humid tropical site in Costa Rica

Pérez D., Kanninen M. (2005). Effect of thinning on stem form and wood characteristics of teak (Tectona grandis) in a humid tropical site in Costa Rica. Silva Fennica vol. 39 no. 2 article id 385. https://doi.org/10.14214/sf.385

Abstract

The aim of the study was to evaluate the effects of thinning intensity on wood properties, such as heartwood proportion, wood basic density, and stem form of teak (Tectona grandis L.f.). The thinning trial was established on a teak plantation in a humid tropical site in northern Costa Rica. The moderate and heavy thinnings yielded the highest percentage of heartwood volume (25 to 30% of total stem volume). The differences between stem form factors under different treatments were not statistically significant after separating thinning effects from timing effects. Both the highest (> 0.65 g cm–3) and the lowest (< 0.50 g cm–3) wood density values were observed under light thinnings, making it difficult to establish a relationship. Large variations in wood properties found under different thinning regimes suggest that at early stages teak stands can be managed under different thinning programs without negatively affecting the quality of wood under humid tropical conditions.

Keywords
stem taper; basic density; heartwood; sapwood; form factor

Author Info
  • Pérez, Ambiente Tierra S.A., Apartado 733-2250, Tres Ríos, Cartago, Costa Rica ORCID ID:E-mail diegoperez@costarricense.cr (email)
  • Kanninen, Center for International Forestry Research (CIFOR), Bogor, Indonesia ORCID ID:

Received 6 July 2004 Accepted 3 May 2005 Published 31 December 2005

Available at https://doi.org/10.14214/sf.385 | Download PDF

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