Full text of this article is only available in PDF format.

Markku Simula (email)

Forestry and development - a global viewpoint.

Simula M. (1985). Forestry and development - a global viewpoint. Silva Fennica vol. 19 no. 4 article id 5248. https://doi.org/10.14214/sf.a15427

Abstract

The area of world forests is gradually declining because of various human activities, such as shifting cultivation, uncontrolled logging and industrial pollution. Continuation of the trends would have detrimental ecological, economic and social effects on global scale. The diversity of the problem is wide. The situation in the tropical developing countries differs from that in the industrialized world. With the present rates of population growth and unchanged forest policies, the fuelwood shortage in developing countries is rapidly aggravating. The need for more agricultural land tends to prejudice conscious efforts to increase wood production.

The industrialized countries are experiencing problems in introducing forest policy means to maintain sufficient timber supply. Rapidly increasing pollution problem cause a serious hazard to the existence of the whole forest ecosystem. Forestry has primarily been a national issue of relatively low priority in political decision-making, which has resulted in insufficient action to remedy the situation at national and international level.

The renewability of forest resources represents a strategic asset, the importance of which is bound to increase in the long-run potential for badly needed economic and social change in the world’s poor rural areas will be lost.

The PDF includes a summary in Finnish.

Keywords
sustainable forestry; forestry; deforestation; developing countries; forest resources; air pollution; developed countries; tropical forests

Published in 1985

Views 327

Available at https://doi.org/10.14214/sf.a15427 | Download PDF

Creative Commons License

Register
Click this link to register to Silva Fennica.
Log in
If you are a registered user, log in to save your selected articles for later access.
Contents alert
Sign up to receive alerts of new content

Your selected articles
Your search results