Full text of this article is only available in PDF format.

Dan Bergström (email), Urban Bergsten, Tomas Nordfjell

Comparison of boom-corridor thinning and thinning from below harvesting methods in young dense Scots pine stands

Bergström D., Bergsten U., Nordfjell T. (2010). Comparison of boom-corridor thinning and thinning from below harvesting methods in young dense Scots pine stands. Silva Fennica vol. 44 no. 4 article id 134. https://doi.org/10.14214/sf.134

Abstract

At present, only a small proportion of the potential extractable bioenergy from young dense forests in Sweden is utilized. The conventional mechanized first thinning systems used in such stands suffer from low productivity, so the operation is only profitable in stands with bigger trees and high standing volumes. Conventional harvesters are used for this operation equipped with accumulating felling heads designed for handling several trees during each crane cycle. In thinning from below the felling and bunching work requires many time-consuming non-linear crane movements to avoid felling or damaging of future crop trees. However, higher productivity can be achieved when trees between strip roads are harvested in about 1 m-wide corridors with a length corresponding to the reach of the crane. We refer to this operation as boom-corridor thinning. The objective of this study was to compare felling and bunching productivity in young dense stands when employing thinning from below or boom-corridor thinning. Experiments were performed using a randomized block design involving between 4400 and 18 600 trees x ha-1 with a corresponding average tree size of 7.2 and 3.2 cm dbh, respectively. Based on the average tree being removed at a dbh of 5.7 cm, the productivity (ODt x PW-hour-1) was significant (almost 16%) higher for the boom-corridor thinning than for thinning from below treatment. At the same time, the time taken for the work element “Crane in-between” (the period between the loaded crane starting to move towards a tree and the felling head rapidly slowing down for positioning) was significantly reduced, by almost 17%. The positive results were achieved even though the operator was new to the method. To achieve a significantly higher efficiency during the felling and bunching operation, development of new harvesting equipment and operating techniques seems crucial.

Keywords
bioenergy; comparative time studies; energy wood; geometric thinning; pre-commercial thinnings; systematic thinnings

Author Info
  • Bergström, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Dept of Forest Resource Management, Section of Planning and Operations Management, Umeå, Sweden ORCID ID:E-mail dan.bergstrom@srh.slu.se (email)
  • Bergsten, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Dept of Forest Resource Management, Section of Planning and Operations Management, Umeå, Sweden ORCID ID:
  • Nordfjell, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Dept of Forest Resource Management, Section of Planning and Operations Management, Umeå, Sweden ORCID ID:

Received 21 January 2010 Accepted 30 September 2010 Published 31 December 2010

Available at https://doi.org/10.14214/sf.134 | Download PDF

Creative Commons License

Register
Click this link to register for Silva Fennica submission and tracking system.
Log in
If you are a registered user, log in to save your selected articles for later access.
Contents alert
Sign up to receive alerts of new content

Your selected articles
Your search results
Ahnlund Ulvcrona K., Bergström D. et al. (2017) Stand structure after thinning in 1–2 m wide cor.. Silva Fennica vol. 51 no. 3 article id 1563
Lideskog H., Ersson B.T. et al. (2014) Determining boreal clearcut object properties an.. Silva Fennica vol. 48 no. 3 article id 1136
Ersson B.T., Bergsten U. et al. (2014) Reloading mechanized tree planting devices faste.. Silva Fennica vol. 48 no. 2 article id 1064
Karlsson L., Mörling T. et al. (2013) Influence of silvicultural regimes on the volume.. Silva Fennica vol. 47 no. 4 article id 938
Edlund J., Bergsten U. et al. (2013) A forest machine bogie with a bearing capacity d.. Silva Fennica vol. 47 no. 3 article id 1017
Ahnlund Ulvcrona K., Karlsson L. et al. (2013) Comparison of silvicultural regimes of lodgepole.. Silva Fennica vol. 47 no. 3 article id 974
Ersson B.T., Jundén L. et al. (2013) Simulated productivity of one- and two-armed tre.. Silva Fennica vol. 47 no. 2 article id 958
Backlund I., Bergsten U. (2012) Biomass production of dense direct-seeded lodgep.. Silva Fennica vol. 46 no. 4 article id 914
Ersson B.T., Bergsten U. et al. (2011) The cost-efficiency of seedling packaging specif.. Silva Fennica vol. 45 no. 3 article id 108
Bergström D., Bergsten U. et al. (2010) Comparison of boom-corridor thinning and thinnin.. Silva Fennica vol. 44 no. 4 article id 134
Chantal M.d., Rita H. et al. (2009) Frost heaving of Picea abies seedlings as influe.. Silva Fennica vol. 43 no. 1 article id 214
Mattson S., Bergsten U. et al. (2007) Pinus contorta growth in boreal Sweden as affect.. Silva Fennica vol. 41 no. 4 article id 273
Wennström U., Bergsten U. et al. (2007) Seedling establishment and growth after direct s.. Silva Fennica vol. 41 no. 2 article id 298
Roturier S., Bäcklund S. et al. (2007) Influence of ground substrate on establishment o.. Silva Fennica vol. 41 no. 2 article id 296
Bergström D., Bergsten U. et al. (2007) Simulation of geometric thinning systems and the.. Silva Fennica vol. 41 no. 1 article id 311
Eriksson D., Lindberg H. et al. (2006) Influence of silvicultural regime on wood struct.. Silva Fennica vol. 40 no. 4 article id 325
Bergsten U. (1988) Invigoration and IDS-sedimentation of Pinus sylv.. Silva Fennica vol. 22 no. 4 article id 5364