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Articles containing the keyword 'northern taiga'

Category: Research article

article id 1072, category Research article
Polina Volkova, Alexey Shipunov, Polina Borisova, Reed Moseng, Ranelle Ivens. (2014). In search of hybridity: the case of Karelian spruces. Silva Fennica vol. 48 no. 2 article id 1072. https://doi.org/10.14214/sf.1072
Keywords: cpDNA; Picea; plant mtDNA; introgression; northern taiga
Highlights: Karelian spruces have morphology that is typical for P. obovata and characterized with genetic variation, described previously for P. abies; Karelian spruces evolved due to introgression between P. abies and P. obovata. However, it is unclear whether Karelian spruces could be treated as P. fennica, because unequivocal morphological and genetic characters of the latter are still absent.
Abstract | Full text in HTML | Full text in PDF | Author Info
Distribution ranges of spruces, European Picea abies and Siberian P. obovata intersect in the Eastern Europe and Urals, forming wide zone of introgressive hybridization where species discrimination is difficult. We applied both molecular (mtDNA and cpDNA sequences) and morphological approaches with goals of elucidating the origin of spruces in undisturbed forests of Russian Karelia (considered as part of the abovementioned introgression zone). Karelian spruces have morphology that is typical for P. obovata and characterized with genetic variation, described previously for P. abies. This contradiction between morphology and organellar DNA could be itself an evidence of hybrid origin because morphological data should have a genetic basis. If the genes responsible for the observed morphological differences are nuclear, that explains why we did not see any deviation of Karelian spruces towards P. obovata in organellar markers. In this situation nuclear gene flow from P. obovata should be performed via pollen. Thus, we should expect Karelian spruces to have cpDNA haplotypes (inherited paternally in conifers) typical for P. obovata. However, it is not the case for the majority of plants sampled and requires additional explanation like chloroplast capture in the introgresson zone. In all, we think that Karelian spruces evolved due to introgression between P. abies and P. obovata. However, it is unclear whether Karelian spruces could be treated as P. fennica, because unequivocal morphological and genetic characters of this hybridogenous species are still absent.
  • Volkova, Moscow South-West High School (No. 1543), 26 Bakinskikh komissarov str. 3–5, RU-119571 Moscow, Russia E-mail: avolkov@orc.ru (email)
  • Shipunov, Department of Biology, Minot State University, Minot, North Dakota, USA 58707 E-mail: dactylorhiza@gmail.com
  • Borisova, Biological Department, Moscow State University, Vorobjevy Gory, RU-119899, Moscow, Russia E-mail: salixhastata@ya.ru
  • Moseng, Minot High School, Minot, North Dakota, USA 58701 E-mail: dactylorhiza@gmail.com
  • Ivens, Department of Biology, Minot State University, Minot, North Dakota, USA 58707 E-mail: dactylorhiza@gmail.com

Category: Research note

article id 10263, category Research note
Paul N. Katjutin, Natalia I. Stavrova, Vadim V. Gorshkov, Andrew Yu. Lyanguzov, Irina Ju. Bakkal, Sergey A. Mikhailov. (2020). Radial growth of trees differing in their vitality in the middle-aged Scots pine forests in the Kola peninsula. Silva Fennica vol. 54 no. 3 article id 10263. https://doi.org/10.14214/sf.10263
Keywords: Pinus sylvestris; northern taiga; radial increment; basal area increment
Highlights: Unmanaged middle-aged boreal Scots pine forests in the Kola peninsula are characterised by the prevalence of moderately and strongly weakened trees (65–70%); Radial increment and basal area increment differ greatly (70–75% and 85–90%, respectively) between Scots pine trees differing in their vitality; The trends of annual ring width in Scots pine trees aged from 15–35 to 65–85 years in green moss and green moss-lichen type pine forests are similar; the dynamics of basal area increment differs substantially in relation to forest site type.
Abstract | Full text in HTML | Full text in PDF | Author Info

The research was carried out in unmanaged middle-aged (75–85 years) Northern taiga Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris L.) forests in the Kola peninsula. It was established that forests of green moss-lichen and green moss site types are characterised by a predominance (65–70% by stand volume) of moderately and strongly weakened trees. Trees of differing vitality have significant differences in annual increment. Healthy trees had a radial increment (RI) 70–75% greater than that of dying trees, and a basal area increment (BAI) 85–90% greater. The dynamics of the RI and BAI of Scots pine trees for the 70-year period (from 1945 to 2015) is different. The RI of all individuals in the communities studied decreases consistently. The decrease is expressed more strongly in green moss Scots pine forests (80–95% from 1945 to 2015) compared to green moss-lichen forests (60–80%); it manifests itself more in strongly weakened and dying individuals (75–95%) than in healthy and moderately weakened ones (60–80%). Annual basal area increment in green moss Scots pine forests increases by 45–65% from stand establishment until the trees are 25 to 35 years old and subsequently decreases by 50–80% to 70–80 years of age. In green moss-lichen pine forests the BAI of Scots pine remains rather stable in healthy and moderately weakened trees and decreases in strongly weakened and dying individuals by 45% and 75–80%, respectively throughout the studied period.

  • Katjutin, Komarov Botanical Institute of the Russian Academy of Sciences, Professora Popova str. 2, 197376, Saint-Petersburg, Russia E-mail: paurussia@binran.ru (email)
  • Stavrova, Komarov Botanical Institute of the Russian Academy of Sciences, Professora Popova str. 2, 197376, Saint-Petersburg, Russia E-mail: nstavrova@binran.ru
  • Gorshkov, Komarov Botanical Institute of the Russian Academy of Sciences, Professora Popova str. 2, 197376, Saint-Petersburg, Russia; Saint-Petersburg State Forest Technical University, letter U, 5, Institutsky per., 194021, Saint-Petersburg, Russia E-mail: vgorshkov@binran.ru
  • Lyanguzov, Saint-Petersburg State University, 7/9 Universitetskaya Emb., 199034, Saint-Petersburg, Russia E-mail: andrewlyanguzov@gmail.com
  • Bakkal, Komarov Botanical Institute of the Russian Academy of Sciences, Professora Popova str. 2, 197376, Saint-Petersburg, Russia E-mail: bakkal@binran.ru
  • Mikhailov, Komarov Botanical Institute of the Russian Academy of Sciences, Professora Popova str. 2, 197376, Saint-Petersburg, Russia E-mail: smikhailov@binran.ru

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