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Silva Fennica 1926-1997
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Acta Forestalia Fennica
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Articles containing the keyword 'herbivore'

Category: Article

article id 5390, category Article
Kari Heliövaara, Kari Löyttyniemi. (1989). Effect of forest fertilization on pine needle-feeding Coleoptera. Silva Fennica vol. 23 no. 4 article id 5390. https://doi.org/10.14214/sf.a15548
Keywords: Pinus sylvestris; herbivores; Chrysomelidae; Curculionidae; fertlization
Abstract | View details | Full text in PDF | Author Info

The effects of forest fertilizers on the intensity of damage caused by two curculionid (Brachyderes incanus L., Brachonyx pineti Paykull) and two chrysomelid (Calomicrus pinicola Duft., Cryptocephalus pini L.) species feeding as adults on Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris L.) needles were investigated in two pine stands growing on dry (Calluna type) sites in South-West Finland. There was much variation in the abundance of the insect species both between the trials and the sample plots. Nitrogen fertilization increased both the height and radial growth of the pines. The curculinids were slightly more abundant on the nitrogen-treated plots. Potassium application seemed to decrease the feeding intensity of the chrysomelids especially. The overall effects were so small that forest fertilization cannot be considered as an effective control method against needle-feeding beetles.

The PDF includes an abstract in Finnish.

  • Heliövaara, E-mail: kh@mm.unknown (email)
  • Löyttyniemi, E-mail: kl@mm.unknown
article id 5367, category Article
Kari Heliövaara, Rauno Väisänen. (1989). Quantitative variation in the elemental composition of Scots pine needles along a pollutant gradient. Silva Fennica vol. 23 no. 1 article id 5367. https://doi.org/10.14214/sf.a15526
Keywords: Pinus sylvestris; needles; Finland; nutrients; Harjavalta; air pollution; heavy metals; herbivores
Abstract | View details | Full text in PDF | Author Info

Quantitative variation in the elemental composition of living Scots pine needles was studied along an atmospheric pollutant gradient in the surroundings of the industrial town Harjavalta, south-western Finland. Two 9-km-long transects, each with nine sample plots, running to the S and SW from factory complex were delimited in a homogenous Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris L.) forest. Needle samples were taken from 10 trees at each site, and from two separate sites in Tuusula near Helsinki. There was considerable spatial variation in the elemental composition of the needles. Heavy metals (Cu, Fe, Zn) showed a clear pattern of exponentially decreasing concentration with increasing distance from the emission source. Sodium and potassium concentrations, as well as the ash weight and air-dry weight, also decreased. Magnesium, manganese and calcium concentrations increased with increasing distance.

The PDF includes an abstract in Finnish.

  • Heliövaara, E-mail: kh@mm.unknown (email)
  • Väisänen, E-mail: rv@mm.unknown
article id 5361, category Article
Kari Heliövaara, Rauno Väisänen. (1988). Interactions among herbivores in three polluted pine stands. Silva Fennica vol. 22 no. 4 article id 5361. https://doi.org/10.14214/sf.a15518
Keywords: Pinus sylvestris; Scots pine; Finland; Harjavalta; air pollution; insect pests; herbivores
Abstract | View details | Full text in PDF | Author Info

Succession of insect attacks on young Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris L.) was studied in heavily, moderately and slightly polluted pine stands within a three-kilometre distance from a prominent emission source in Western Finland. The total number of pest species was highest in the moderately polluted stand, but unlike other herbivores, aphids were also abundant in the heavily polluted stands. A few positive but no negative interactions were detected between herbivores, which suggests that insect species may benefit from a previous occurrence of other species in the same tree.

The PDF includes an abstract in Finnish.

  • Heliövaara, E-mail: kh@mm.unknown (email)
  • Väisänen, E-mail: rv@mm.unknown

Category: Research article

article id 9946, category Research article
Frauke Fedderwitz, Niklas Björklund, Velemir Ninkovic, Göran Nordlander. (2018). Does the pine weevil (Hylobius abietis) prefer conifer seedlings over other main food sources? Silva Fennica vol. 52 no. 3 article id 9946. https://doi.org/10.14214/sf.9946
Keywords: Pinus sylvestris; Picea abies; forest regeneration; feeding preference; herbivore; plant tissues
Highlights: Adult pine weevils feed on seedlings and mature conifers, but cause economic damage only on seedlings; Their feeding preferences for branches and roots over seedlings were tested in a laboratory experiment; The only clear preference was for Norway spruce roots; Results support new approaches of seedling protection attempting to redirect pine weevils from planted seedlings to other food sources.
Abstract | Full text in HTML | Full text in PDF | Author Info

Adult pine weevils (Hylobius abietis (L.)) feed on the tender bark of branches and roots of mature conifer trees and on the stem bark of conifer seedlings. Their feeding on mature trees does not cause any economic damage, but their feeding on planted seedlings is so devastating that the pine weevil is considered one of the most important forest pest insects in Europe. We asked whether the pine weevil prefers seedlings over other regularly utilized food sources. This question is of particular interest because new approaches to seedling protection are based on decreasing any preference for seedlings by using less palatable plants or by enhancing their defence (by genetic selection or by methyl jasmonate treatment). In a laboratory choice experiment we tested pine weevil feeding preferences for seedlings compared with branches and roots from mature trees (separately for Norway spruce and Scots pine). Pine weevils preferred roots, but not branches, of Norway spruce over seedlings of the same species. With Scots pine there were no clear preferences, but the weevils showed a tendency to prefer roots over seedlings. These results provide support for seedling protection approaches that attempt to redirect pine feeding from planted seedlings to other food sources.

  • Fedderwitz, Department of Ecology, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Box 7044, SE-750 07 Uppsala, Sweden E-mail: frauke.fedderwitz@slu.se (email)
  • Björklund, Department of Ecology, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Box 7044, SE-750 07 Uppsala, Sweden E-mail: niklas.bjorklund@slu.se
  • Ninkovic, Department of Ecology, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Box 7044, SE-750 07 Uppsala, Sweden E-mail: velemir.ninkovic@slu.se
  • Nordlander, Department of Ecology, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Box 7044, SE-750 07 Uppsala, Sweden E-mail: goran.nordlander@slu.se

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