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Articles containing the keyword 'antioxidant'

Category: Research article

article id 160, category Research article
Fan Yang, Ling-Feng Miao. (2010). Adaptive responses to progressive drought stress in two poplar species originating from different altitudes. Silva Fennica vol. 44 no. 1 article id 160. https://doi.org/10.14214/sf.160
Keywords: antioxidant enzymes; drought stress; free proline; hydrogen peroxide; malondialdehyde; Populus
Abstract | View details | Full text in PDF | Author Info
Cuttings of Populus kangdingensis C. Wang et Tung and Populus cathayana Rehder, originating from high and low altitudes in the eastern Himalaya, respectively, were examined during one growing season in a greenhouse to determine the effects of progressive drought stress. The results manifested that the adaptive responses to progressive drought stress were different in these two species from different altitudes. Significant changes in stem height, leaf development, relative water content (RWC), malondialdehyde (MDA) and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) appeared earlier in P. cathayana than in P. kangdingensis, whereas changes in soluble protein, soluble sugar, free proline and antioxidant enzymes appeared earlier in P. kangdingensis. In addition, changes in these parameters became more and more significant when the drought stress progressed, especially under severe drought stress in P. cathayana. Plant growth showed significant positive correlations with soluble proteins and sugars, free proline and antioxidants and a significant negative correlation with RWC under water stressed treatment in two poplar species. Compared with P. cathayana, P. kangdingensis was able to maintain a superior height growth and leaf development under drought stress. Also, P. kangdingensis possessed greater increments in soluble protein, soluble sugar, free proline and antioxidant enzymes, but lower increments in MDA and H2O2 than did P. cathayana when the cuttings were exposed to progressive drought stress. Our results suggest that P. kangdingensis originating from the high altitude has a better drought tolerance than does P. cathayana originating from the low altitude. Furthermore, this study manifested that acclimation to drought stress are related the rapidity, severity, duration of the drought event and the altitude of two poplar species.
  • Yang, Wuhan Botanical Garden, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Wuhan, Hubei 430074, P. R. China (yangfan@wbgcas.cn) & Chengdu Institute of Biology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, P.O. Box 416, Chengdu, Sichuan 610041, P. R. China E-mail: fanyangmlf6303@163.com (email)
  • Miao, Wuhan Institute of Virology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Wuhan, Hubei 430071, P. R. China E-mail: lfm@nn.cn
article id 224, category Research article
Xiangwen Xiao, Xiao Xu, Fan Yang. (2008). Adaptive responses to progressive drought stress in two Populus cathayana populations. Silva Fennica vol. 42 no. 5 article id 224. https://doi.org/10.14214/sf.224
Keywords: antioxidant enzymes; free proline; malondialdehyde; soluble sugars; drought tolerance; Populus cathayana
Abstract | View details | Full text in PDF | Author Info
The young, vegetatively propagated cuttings of Populus cathayana Rehder were exposed to a progressive drought stress for 12 weeks in a greenhouse to characterize the physiological and biochemical basis of drought adaptation in woody plants. Two contrasting populations were employed in our study, which were from the wet and dry climate regions in western China, respectively. The results showed that the adaptive responses of P. cathayana to drought were affected by drought intensity and poplar genotype (population). The progressive drought stress significantly inhibited plant growth, increased carotenoid contents and, at the same time, accumulated soluble sugars and free proline in the plants of both populations tested. On the other hand, the gradually increasing drought also induced antioxidative systems including the increase of the activities of superoxide dismutase (SOD) and guaiacol peroxidase (POD). Moreover, there were different responses to progressive drought stress between the two contrasting populations. Compared with the wet climate population, the dry climate population had lower shoot height and growth rate, higher free proline content, and more efficient photoprotective system (such as higher carotenoid content and Car/Chl) and antioxidant system (such as higher POD activity), as a result of drought stress. These results suggest that the dry climate population possesses better drought tolerance than the wet climate population. The differences in drought tolerance may be closely related with efficient photoprotective system, accumulation of the osmoprotectant proline as well as the increased capacity of the antioxidative system to scavenge reactive oxygen species, and the consequent suppressed level of lipid peroxidation under drought conditions.
  • Xiao, Chengdu Institute of Biology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, P.O. Box 416, Chengdu 610041, P. R. China; Graduate School of the Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100039, P. R. China E-mail: xiaoxw@cib.ac.cn (email)
  • Xu, Chengdu Institute of Biology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, P.O. Box 416, Chengdu 610041, P. R. China; Graduate School of the Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100039, P. R. China E-mail: xx@nn.cn
  • Yang, Chengdu Institute of Biology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, P.O. Box 416, Chengdu 610041, P. R. China; Graduate School of the Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100039, P. R. China E-mail: fy@nn.cn

Category: Review article

article id 10516, category Review article
Faujiah N. Ritonga, Jacob N. Ngatia, Run X. Song, Umar Farooq, Sonia Somadona, Andi T. Lestari, Su Chen. (2021). Abiotic stresses induced physiological, biochemical, and molecular changes in Betula platyphylla: a review. Silva Fennica vol. 55 no. 3 article id 10516. https://doi.org/10.14214/sf.10516
Keywords: antioxidant; cis-acting elements; gene; ROS production; transcription factor
Highlights: Abiotic stress influence Betula platyphylla growth, development, and yield production by impairing physiological, biochemical, and molecular functions; Overexpression or RNAi line of transcription factors enhance the abiotic stress tolerance of B. platyphylla; MYB and AP2/ERF are the most frequently transcription factor family that has been explored over the last two decades in B. platyphylla under abiotic stress.
Abstract | Full text in HTML | Full text in PDF | Author Info

Abiotic stress is one of the major factors in reducing plant growth, development, and yield production by interfering with various physiological, biochemical, and molecular functions. In particular, abiotic stress such as salt, low temperature, heat, drought, UV-radiation, elevated CO2, ozone, and heavy metals stress is the most frequent study in Betula platyphylla Sukaczev. Betula platyphylla is one of the most valuable tree species in East Asia facing abiotic stress during its life cycle. Using transgenic plants is a powerful tool to increase the B. platyphylla abiotic stress tolerance. Generally, abiotic stress reduces leaves water content, plant height, fresh and dry weight, and enhances shed leaves as well. In the physiological aspect, salt, heavy metal, and osmotic stress disturbs seed germination, stomatal conductance, chlorophyll content, and photosynthesis. In the biochemical aspect, salt, drought, cold, heat, osmotic, UV-B radiation, and heavy metal stress increases the ROS production of B. platyphylla cells, resulting in the enhancement of enzymatic antioxidant (SOD and POD) and non-enzymatic antioxidant (proline and AsA) to reduce the ROS accumulation. Meanwhile, B. platyphylla upregulates various genes, as well as proteins to participate in abiotic stress tolerance. Based on recent studies, several transcription factors contribute to increasing abiotic stress tolerance in B. platyphylla, including BplMYB46, BpMYB102, BpERF13, BpERF2, BpHOX2, BpHMG6, BpHSP9, BpUVR8, BpBZR1, BplERD15, and BpNACs. These transcription factors bind to different cis-acting elements to upregulate abiotic stress-related genes, resulting in the enhancement of salt, drought, cold, heat, osmotic, UV-B radiation, and heavy metal tolerance. These genes along with phytohormones mitigate the abiotic stress. This review also highlights the candidate genes from another Betulacea family member that might be contributing to increasing B. platyphylla abiotic stress tolerance.

  • Ritonga, State Key Laboratory of Tree Genetics and Breeding, Forestry College, Northeast Forestry University, Harbin 150040, China E-mail: ritongafaujiah@ymail.com
  • Ngatia, College of Wildlife and Protected Areas, Northeast Forestry University, Harbin 150040, China E-mail: jacob.ngatia3@gmail.com
  • Song, State Key Laboratory of Tree Genetics and Breeding, Forestry College, Northeast Forestry University, Harbin 150040, China E-mail: 13359850710@163.com
  • Farooq, College of Life Science, Northeast Forestry University, Harbin 150040, China E-mail: uf@nn.ch
  • Somadona, College of Agriculture, Riau University, Pekanbaru 28293, Indonesia E-mail: sonia_hut@yahoo.co.id
  • Lestari, Forestry Major, College of Agriculture, Mataram University, Mataram 83125, Indonesia E-mail: atlestari@unram.ac.id
  • Chen, State Key Laboratory of Tree Genetics and Breeding, Forestry College, Northeast Forestry University, Harbin 150040, China E-mail: chensu@nefu.edu.cn (email)

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